Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Mammoth project reveals frozen secrets

09.01.2003


Which way does a mammoth skeleton point in Siberia? No, it’s not a Christmas cracker joke. To find the answer you have to look in a rather surprising place – the Institute of Physics’ new online archive.


Jerry Cowhig, Managing Director of Institute of Physics Publishing and Professor Kathy Sykes, Collier chair of public engagement of science and engineering at Bristol University, are searching the online IOP Journal Archive. Every journal article published by the Institute of Physics since 1874 is now available to subscribers



In an article published in the first edition of Proceedings of the Physical Society in 1874, John Rae writes about the physical properties of ice and mammoth remains. He put forward a theory as to why so many of the mammoth skeletons found near the Yenesei river in Siberia had been found with their heads pointing southwards. He said that if these mammoths died in or near the river, their bodies would get swept down the river to the shallow area near the mouth. The mammoth’s head, weighed down by its tusks and skull, would drag along the bottom and in shallow water the body would still float with the current – in a similar way to a boat pulling on an anchor. When the river froze in winter, the mammoths would become frozen in this position – with their heads pointing southwards with the flow. As this river flows from south to north, the heads would be pointing southwards when they froze.

This fascinating article can be accessed for the first time on the World Wide Web on the IOP Journal Archive. Every journal article published by the Institute of Physics since 1874 is now available to subscribers – that is over 500 volume-years of journals, over 100,000 articles and over one million pages of scientific research.


“This was a massive project, and it will significantly benefit research in physics and maintains our long tradition of innovation in electronic publishing,” said Jerry Cowhig, Managing Director of Institute of Physics Publishing.

Articles by many pioneering physicists can be found in the archive, including some by William and Lawrence Bragg. This father and son team shared a Nobel Prize for their work on x-ray crystallography, which was the method used in the discovery of the structure of DNA.

“This is a great resource for anyone with an interest in physics or its history. You can read original articles by physicists like Schrödinger, who you usually only read about in text books,” said Professor Kathy Sykes, Collier chair of public engagement of science and engineering at Bristol University.

Non-subscribers can search the archive, and view the abstracts of the papers. To access the full paper, a paid subscription is needed.

Michelle Cain | alfa
Further information:
http://www.iop.org/EJ
http://physics.iop.org/IOP/Press/prlist.html

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht MEMS chips get metatlenses
21.02.2018 | American Institute of Physics

nachricht International team publishes roadmap to enhance radioresistance for space colonization
21.02.2018 | Biogerontology Research Foundation

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers invent tiny, light-powered wires to modulate brain's electrical signals

21.02.2018 | Life Sciences

The “Holy Grail” of peptide chemistry: Making peptide active agents available orally

21.02.2018 | Life Sciences

Atomic structure of ultrasound material not what anyone expected

21.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>