Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Pulsating Star Sheds Light on Exoplanet

31.07.2013
A team of researchers has devised a way to measure the internal properties of stars—a method that offers more accurate assessments of their orbiting planets.

The research, which appears in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was conducted by a multi-national team of scientists, including physicists at New York University, Princeton University, and the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research.


Image courtesy of MPI for Solar System Research/Mark A. Garlick (www.markgarlick.com).

An artistic rendering of HD 52265 and its orbiting Jupiter-like planet.

The researchers examined HD 52265—a star approximately 92 light years away and nearly 20 percent more massive than our Sun. More than a decade ago, scientists identified an exopanet—a planet outside our Solar System—in the star’s orbit. HD 52265, then, served as an ideal model for both measuring stars’ properties and how such properties can shed light on planetary systems.

Previously, scientists inferred stars’ properties, such as radius, mass, and age, by considering observations of their brightness and color. Often these stars’ properties were not known to sufficient accuracy to further characterize the nearby planets.

In the PNAS study, the scientists adopted a new approach to characterize star-planet systems: asteroseismology, which identifies the internal properties of stars by measuring their surface oscillations. Some have compared this approach to seismologists’ use of earthquake oscillations to examine the earth’s interior.

Here, they were able to make several assessments of the star’s traits, including its mass, radius, age, and—for the first time— internal rotation. They used the COROT space telescope, part of a space mission led by the French Space Agency (CNES) in conjunction with the European Space Agency (ESA), to detect tiny fluctuations in the intensity of starlight caused by starquakes. The researchers confirmed the validity of the seismic results by comparing them with independent measurements of related phenomena. These included the motion of dark spots on the star’s surface and the star’s spectroscopic rotational velocity.

Unlike other methods, the technique of asteroseismology returns both the rotation period of the star and the inclination of the rotation axis to the line of sight.

The scientists could then use these findings to make a more definitive determination of an orbiting exoplanet. While it had previously been identified as an exoplanet by other scientists, some raised doubts about this conclusion, positing that it could actually be a brown dwarf—an object too small to be a star and too large to be a planet.

But, armed with the precise calculations yielded by asteroseismology, the researchers on the PNAS study were able to enhance the certainty of the earlier conclusion. Specifically, given the inclination of the rotation axis of HD 52265 and the minimum mass of the nearby exoplanet, the researchers could infer the true mass of the latter—which was calculated to be roughly twice that of our planet Jupiter and therefore too small to be a brown dwarf.

The study’s authors included: Katepalli Sreenivasan, president of Polytechnic Institute of NYU and dean of engineering at NYU; Shravan Hanasoge, an associate research scholar in geosciences at Princeton University and a visiting scholar at NYU’s Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences; and Laurent Gizon, director of the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research and a professor at the University of Goettingen in Germany.

James Devitt | Newswise
Further information:
http://www.nyu.edu

Further reports about: Exoplanet LIGHT Max Planck Institute NYU PNAS Princeton Pulsating Solar Decathlon Space brown dwarf

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Measured for the first time: Direction of light waves changed by quantum effect
24.05.2017 | Vienna University of Technology

nachricht Physicists discover mechanism behind granular capillary effect
24.05.2017 | University of Cologne

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Physicists discover mechanism behind granular capillary effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Measured for the first time: Direction of light waves changed by quantum effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>