Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Planetary Exploration Suit Will be Tested in Antarctica

18.03.2011
University of North Dakota aerospace engineer and researcher Pablo de Leon is part of a unique mission to test a UND planetary exploration suit -- the NDX-1 -- at a remote military base in Antarctica. The team departed for the Antarctic base from an Argentine Air Force site earlier this week.

The Spaceward Bound Mission includes de Leon of the UND Department of Space Studies; NASA space biologist Jon Rask; and NASA astrobiologist Dr. Chris McKay. Rask is Senior Scientist and McKay is a planetary scientist at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Ames Research near San Francisco, CA. The team also includes a field support and documentation specialist.

The team is expected to spend seven to 10 days at the Marambio Station, Argentina’s main Antarctic base, to conduct a variety of tests with the NDX-1 planetary exploration suit system. The NDX-1 also has been tested extensively in the Badlands and at the Dahlen Esker in North Dakota, at the Mars Desert Research Center in Utah, and at the Ames Research Center.

The NDX-1 was designed and constructed at UND through NASA funding provided by the North Dakota Space Grant Consortium.

The team plans to blog this expedition; you can follow the team’s test routines at http://spacesuitlab.blogspot.com/

Background
Since 2008, NASA Ames Research Center and the University of North Dakota have worked together to incorporate the pressurized NDX-1 space suit into subsurface drilling and sample gathering tests at astrobiologically interesting field sites in North Dakota, USA. The team has successfully demonstrated that a subject who has donned the pressurized NDX-1 suit can accomplish drilling operations and soil/rock sample gathering procedures.
Goals
Antarctica is arguably the most Mars-like location on Earth, and is therefore an excellent location to test scientific hypotheses and technologies that support Mars exploration. The four main goals of this mission are to test the use of pressurized space suit technology in Antarctica; test rock-drilling technologies; test radiation/dosimetry technologies; gather soil samples from the permafrost for microbial analysis; and document the entire expedition.

The expedition to Antarctica is modeled on the experience learned in North Dakota to accomplish several objectives, including a demonstration in the use of a pressurized space suit and drilling operations at desired locations with rock drilling technologies.

Samples of soil and ice will be gathered at the top of the permafrost boundary, at the ice-soil interface, as well as within the permafrost. The data gathered from this analysis will be compared to data from UND space suit experiments conducted earlier, including a test and demonstration conducted earlier in western North Dakota that garnered international attention.

Useful links:
*UND Space Suit Laboratory http://www.human.space.edu/current.html
*UND Space Suit blog http://spacesuitlab.blogspot.com/
*NASA Web page about UND space suit program
http://nasawatch.com/archives/2006/05/und-tests-experimental-planetary-space-suit.html

*UND Department of Space Studies http://www.space.edu/

Juan Miguel Pedraza | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.space.edu
http://www.und.edu

Further reports about: Antarctic Predators Antarctica Dakota Exploration NASA Planetary Suit

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Measured for the first time: Direction of light waves changed by quantum effect
24.05.2017 | Vienna University of Technology

nachricht Physicists discover mechanism behind granular capillary effect
24.05.2017 | University of Cologne

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Physicists discover mechanism behind granular capillary effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Measured for the first time: Direction of light waves changed by quantum effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>