Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

ORMatE returns to NRL after nearly 2 years in Earth orbit

02.10.2009
Completing an 18-month mission orbiting the Earth more than 6,000 times on-orbit the International Space Station (ISS), the Optical Reflector Material Experiment (ORMatE-1) returns to Washington, D.C., to NRL's Electronics Science and Technology Division to begin experiment testing and analysis.

Retrieved September 2009 by the crew of NASA's Space Shuttle Endeavour, ORMatE-1 is a passive study of optically reflective materials with a focus on silicon carbide (SiC) for use as a lightweight mirror substrate. Various types of SiC ceramics, as well as various coating materials and cladding deposition technologies are also tested in the experiment.

"Lightweight, high precision mirrors are critical for enhanced optical systems and advanced communication systems currently being designed and tested," said Robert Walters, Ph.D., head of NRL's Solid State Devices Branch. "The effects of different optical polishing methods are investigated to determine if the different processes result in varying resistance to radiation exposure for future space-based applications."

ORMatE-1 provides a platform to expose new materials to the harsh environment of space and to generate on-orbit performance data to support space qualification of specific materials. The experiments are housed within the Passive Experiment Container (PEC), a roughly two-foot by two-foot metal box, and affixed to the ISS. After an exposed period of one to two years, the PEC is closed and recovered by an astronaut for return to Earth for post-flight evaluation.

... more about:
»Earth's magnetic field »ISS »Laboratory »NASA »NRL »Naval »ORMatE »ORMatE-1 »PEC »SIC »Space

In addition to SiC material testing, NRL scientists will conduct post-flight analysis of other advanced glass substrate materials including ultra-low expansion (ULE) and corrugated borosilicate, multiple coating and traditional substrate combinations and a novel mirror design consisting of a composite sandwich structure of molded borosilicate used to evaluate structural integrity and optical performance. ORMatE-1 will help quantify effects on optical and mechanical properties as a result of radiation, micrometeor pitting and compaction, which can change the radius curvature of components. Research will also assist in determining the effects of degassing of dense and porous materials as a result of going from ambient to vacuum conditions, ultra-violet (UV) and atomic oxygen exposure.

ORMatE-1 is conducted as a scientific research partnership with The Aerospace Corporation, Naval Research Laboratory and the Air Force Research Laboratory Materials Directorate (AFRL/ML) and is part of NASA's Materials on the International Space Station Experiment (MISSE), a Langley Research Center (LaRC) program designed to provide rapid access to space for materials and device exposure tests via the ISS.

The Naval Research Laboratory is the Department of the Navy's corporate laboratory. NRL conducts a broad program of scientific research, technology, and advanced development. The Laboratory, with a total complement of nearly 2,500 personnel, is located in southwest Washington, DC, with other major sites at the Stennis Space Center, MS; and Monterey, CA.

Daniel Parry | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.nrl.navy.mil

Further reports about: Earth's magnetic field ISS Laboratory NASA NRL Naval ORMatE ORMatE-1 PEC SIC Space

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Significantly more productivity in USP lasers
06.12.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

nachricht Shape matters when light meets atom
05.12.2016 | Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

NTU scientists build new ultrasound device using 3-D printing technology

07.12.2016 | Health and Medicine

The balancing act: An enzyme that links endocytosis to membrane recycling

07.12.2016 | Life Sciences

How to turn white fat brown

07.12.2016 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>