Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Always nicely in pairs and indistinguishable: Photons at the push of a button

20.02.2014
Encryption technologies with the help of quanta (quantum cryptography) or optical quantum computing require special light conditions, so-called indistinguishable and interlocked photon pairs, in well-defined temporal pulses.

Existing procedures to generate these, however, lead to results occurring more by chance in view of the number of photon pairs in one pulse. The consequences are errors in the quantum algorithms that greatly restrict their usefulness for deterministic quantum technologies that depend on the predictive accuracy.


Optical stimulation of a semi-conductor quantum point with a short laser pulse (green), that emits single interlocked quantum pairs (red resp. blue). Image: University of Stuttgart

In an experiment based on a semi-conductor quantum point, physicists from the University of Stuttgart have now shown how it is possible to generate single indistinguishable photon pairs based on parametric down conversion at the push of a button, so to speak. The work was published in the renowned specialist journal Nature Photonics*.

Semi-conductor quantum points are ideally suited to generate interlocked photon pairs due to their properties. In this way the quantum point can be stimulated through a short optical or electrical pulse, and subsequently a so-called photon pair based on parametric down conversion can be released if the conditions are suitable and be used for applications.

In the case of such photon pairs, the polarisation of each single photon is initially completely undefined. Only the targeted measurement on one of the two photons also enables a direct statement on the polarisation of the second photon, but this occurs immediately. In so doing it is irrelevant to what extent the single photons are separated from each other spatially. This property is exploited in a targeted way in the quantum technologies, for example for bug-proof communication.

In work up to now to generate interlocked photon pairs, the quantum points were optically stimulated electrically or in a non-resonant way. This method of stimulating, however, entails some disadvantages. In this respect, exactly two electron pair of holes are not stimulated for each stimulation pulse and subsequently two photons (an interlocked photon pair) emitted. It is rather the case that only one single proton or more than two photons are released. The fact that these stimulation conditions also generate many charge carriers in the environment of the quantum point is even more problematic. The interaction between these charge carriers and the charge carriers in the quantum point leads to so-called decoherence processes, that ultimately limit the indistinguishability of the photons.

Physicists at the Institute of Semiconductor Optics and Functional Interfaces under the management of Prof. Dr. Peter Michler have now succeeded of stimulating the quantum point with exactly two electron pair of holes with a so-called resonant two-photon stimulation process. Consequently, only one interlocked photon pair is emitted through this. Moreover, it was able to be shown that the photons generated in this resonant way are undistinguishable to a great extent, making them well suited for the aforementioned applications.

The more exact photon pair generation rate of 86 percent achieved in this way was able to be determined in cooperation with the theoretic physicist Dr. Martin Glässl from the University of Bayreuth. This joint work is now the starting point for a range of further experiments in which the photon source is to be used for experiments on the quantum teleportation of photons, for example.

* Original publication: M. Müller, S. Bounouar, K. D. Jöns, M. Glässl, and P. Michler, Nature Photonics, DOI 10.1038/nphoton.2013.377

Further information:
Prof. Dr. Peter Michler, Institute of Semi Semiconductor Optics and Functional Interfaces, Tel. 0711/685-64660,

Email: p.michler (at) ihfg.uni-stuttgart.de

Andrea Mayer-Grenu | idw
Further information:
http://www.ihfg.uni-stuttgart.de

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Winds a quarter the speed of light spotted leaving mysterious binary systems
29.04.2016 | University of Cambridge

nachricht Possible Extragalactic Source of High-Energy Neutrinos
28.04.2016 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Tiny microbots that can clean up water

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute Stuttgart have developed self-propelled tiny ‘microbots’ that can remove lead or organic pollution from contaminated water.

Working with colleagues in Barcelona and Singapore, Samuel Sánchez’s group used graphene oxide to make their microscale motors, which are able to adsorb lead...

Im Focus: ORNL researchers discover new state of water molecule

Neutron scattering and computational modeling have revealed unique and unexpected behavior of water molecules under extreme confinement that is unmatched by any known gas, liquid or solid states.

In a paper published in Physical Review Letters, researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory describe a new tunneling state of...

Im Focus: Bionic Lightweight Design researchers of the Alfred Wegener Institute at Hannover Messe 2016

Honeycomb structures as the basic building block for industrial applications presented using holo pyramid

Researchers of the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) will introduce their latest developments in the field of bionic lightweight design at Hannover Messe from 25...

Im Focus: New world record for fullerene-free polymer solar cells

Polymer solar cells can be even cheaper and more reliable thanks to a breakthrough by scientists at Linköping University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). This work is about avoiding costly and unstable fullerenes.

Polymer solar cells can be even cheaper and more reliable thanks to a breakthrough by scientists at Linköping University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences...

Im Focus: Ultra-thin glass is up and coming

As one of the leading R&D partners in the development of surface technologies and organic electronics, the Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP will be exhibiting its recent achievements in vacuum coating of ultra-thin glass at SVC TechCon 2016 (Booth 846), taking place in Indianapolis / USA from May 9 – 13.

Fraunhofer FEP is an experienced partner for technological developments, known for testing the limits of new materials and for optimization of those materials...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

The “AC21 International Forum 2016” is About to Begin

27.04.2016 | Event News

Soft switching combines efficiency and improved electro-magnetic compatibility

15.04.2016 | Event News

Grid-Supportive Buildings Give Boost to Renewable Energy Integration

12.04.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Winds a quarter the speed of light spotted leaving mysterious binary systems

29.04.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

Fiber optic biosensor-integrated microfluidic chip to detect glucose levels

29.04.2016 | Health and Medicine

A cell senses its own curves: New research from the MBL Whitman Center

29.04.2016 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>