Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Nanomagnetism in X-ray Light

23.03.2017

Today’s most advanced scanning X-ray microscope is operated by the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems at Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin.

The MAXYMUS scanning X-ray microscope has its home at Berlin’s synchrotron radiation source BESSY II at Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin. Scientific support is provided by Dr. Markus Weigand from the “Modern Magnetic Systems” department at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (MPI-IS) under the management of Professor Dr. Gisela Schütz.


Left: X-ray microscope image of a magnetic skyrmion. Right: Snapshot of the spin waves generated by a magnetic plate excited by microwaves (red: magnetization fully directed upward, blue: downward)

© MPI-IS Stuttgart

MAXYMUS stands for “MAgnetic X-raY Micro and UHV Spectroscope”. The special fea-tures of this scanning X-ray microscope are its variable specimen environment and broad application spectrum. “It makes it possible to observe ultra-fast processes at 20 times better resolution compared to an optical microscope,” explains Professor Dr. Gisela Schütz.

“In addition to this combination of spatial and temporal resolution, the extremely high sensitivity to the magnetism of nanostructures is unique.” In the field of studying the magnetization dynamics of nanostructures, the department holds the world record in this combination of time (10 picoseconds, i.e. 100 billion images per econd) and spatial resolution (15 nanometers = 0.000,015 mm).

“With MAXYMUS, our users are provided extremely attractive experimentation options, and not only in the area of magnetism,” says Dr. Markus Weigand, who as Max Planck Group Leader in Berlin is responsible for the management and continuous further development of the X-ray microscope.

Researchers in other fields, who for example want to investigate the composition of harmful substance particles in the atmosphere or the photochemistry of endoscopic lithium battery particles, find answers to burning questions here as well. External users can also access the services of MAXYMUS by application. This has led to long standing cooperation with numerous scientists from various research institutions, and the demand for booking MAXYMUS “beamtime” is continuously growing.

In the field of nanomagnetism in particular, exciting new phenomena and technology concepts that can only be “illuminated” with the required speed and spatial resolution in MAXYMUS have recently been causing a stir. Successful cooperation between Max Planck researchers and external scientists, for example at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), University of Mainz, the Paul-Scherrer Institute in Villingen, Switzerland and the CNRS in Paris led to several high-ranking publications in the renowned journals Nature Physics, Nature Materials, and Nature Nanotechnology in 2016.

They contain fundamental studies in the field known as magnonics. Ultra-fast short-wavelength spin waves (in the magnons particle structure) are intended to enable energy-saving data processing that can be controlled with today’s sophisticated microwave technology. “Making these spin waves visible, comparable to waves made by a stone that drops into water, is very impressive even for a scientist,” explains Dr. Sebastian Wintz of PSI in Villigen, Switzerland (see figure).

Observing the emergence and manipulation of what are known as skyrmions, magnetic vortexes that behave like particles of finite mass and can be controlled with minimal currents, is just as spectacular (see figure). Here too the relevance for future applications in the field of information technology is hotly discussed in countless contributions at corresponding international conferences. Kai Litzius, postgraduate at the chair of Prof. Kläui in Mainz, explains: “By being able to observe the movement of the smallest individual skyrmions, we gain important knowledge about their fundamental magnetic interactions.”

The accuracy of MAXYMUS can be improved by magnitudes with the planned reduction of the length of X-ray light pulses to be realized by BESSY II in the coming years and the significantly greater spatial resolution by using the scattering of X-rays. “Fundamentally, today’s attractive possibilities still harbor the potential for significant optimization. We are still far from reaching the physical limits,” Dr. Markus Weigand predicts.

Publications:

S. Wintz, V. Tiberkevich, M. Weigand, J. Raabe, J. Lindner, A. Erbe, A. Slavin, J. Fass-bender, “Magnetic vortex cores as tunable spin-wave emitters”,
Nature Nanotechnology, 2016, (DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2016.117)

Kai Litzius, Ivan Lemesh, Benjamin Krüger, Pedram Bassirian, Lucas Caretta, Kornel Richter Felix Büttner, Koji Sato, Oleg A. Tretiakov, Johannes Förster, Robert M. Reeve, Markus Weigand, Iuliia Bykova, Hermann Stoll, Gisela Schütz, Geoffrey S.D. Beach and Mathias Kläui, “Skyrmion Hall effect revealed by direct time-resolved X-ray microscopy”, Nature Physics, 2017 (DOI: 10.1038/nphys4000)

Seonghoon Woo, Kai Litzius, Benjamin Krüger, Mi-Young Im, Lucas Caretta, Kornel Rich-ter, Maxwell Mann, Andrea Krone, Robert M. Reeve, Markus Weigand, Parnica Agrawal, Ivan Lemesh, Mohamad-Assaad Mawass, Peter Fischer, Mathias Kläui and Geoffrey S.D. Beach, “Observation of room-temperature magnetic skyrmions and their current-driven dynamics in ultrathin metallic ferromagnets”
Nature Materials, 2016 (DOI: 10.1038/nmat4593)

C. Moreau-Luchaire, C.Moutafis, N. Reyren, J.Sampaio, C.A.F. Vaz, N.Van Horne, K. Bouzehouane, K.Garcia, C. Deranlot, P. Warnicke, P. Wohlhüter, J.-M. George, M. Weigand, J.Raabe, V.Cros and A.Fert, “Additive interfacial chiral interaction in multi-layers for stabilization of small individual skyrmions at room temperature”
Nature Nanotechnology, 2016 (DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2015.313)

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.is.mpg.de/schuetz

Annette Stumpf | Max-Planck-Institut für Intelligente Systeme
Further information:
http://www.is.mpg.de

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht NUS engineers develop novel method for resolving spin texture of topological surface states using transport measurements
26.04.2018 | National University of Singapore

nachricht European particle-accelerator community publishes the first industry compendium
26.04.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Organische Elektronik, Elektronenstrahl- und Plasmatechnik FEP

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Why we need erasable MRI scans

New technology could allow an MRI contrast agent to 'blink off,' helping doctors diagnose disease

Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a widely used medical tool for taking pictures of the insides of our body. One way to make MRI scans easier to read is...

Im Focus: BAM@Hannover Messe: innovative 3D printing method for space flight

At the Hannover Messe 2018, the Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM) will show how, in the future, astronauts could produce their own tools or spare parts in zero gravity using 3D printing. This will reduce, weight and transport costs for space missions. Visitors can experience the innovative additive manufacturing process live at the fair.

Powder-based additive manufacturing in zero gravity is the name of the project in which a component is produced by applying metallic powder layers and then...

Im Focus: Molecules Brilliantly Illuminated

Physicists at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics, which is jointly run by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, have developed a high-power laser system that generates ultrashort pulses of light covering a large share of the mid-infrared spectrum. The researchers envisage a wide range of applications for the technology – in the early diagnosis of cancer, for instance.

Molecules are the building blocks of life. Like all other organisms, we are made of them. They control our biorhythm, and they can also reflect our state of...

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

World's smallest optical implantable biodevice

26.04.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Molecular evolution: How the building blocks of life may form in space

26.04.2018 | Life Sciences

First Li-Fi-product with technology from Fraunhofer HHI launched in Japan

26.04.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>