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Nano-Diamond Qubits and Photonic Crystals

01.12.2010
Milestone reached on the path to integrated quantum technology

Quantum information processing is arguably one of the most fascinating facets of modern quantum physics.

A quantum computer operates with quantum bits (qubits) as units of information. Obeying the laws of quantum mechanics, such a computer would be capable of addressing several of the most difficult computational tasks unsolvable with present technology. In the past few decades, scientists learned to perform room-sized experiments to optically control and read out a small number of qubits.

Now, researchers in Germany have successfully fabricated a rudimentary quantum computing hybrid system using electronic excitations in nano-diamonds as qubits and optical nanostructures, so-called photonic crystals with tailored optical properties. This architecture may allow integration of multi-qubit systems on a single micrometer-sized chip for future quantum computers.

"Our results suggest a strategy for scaling up quantum information to large-scale systems, which has yet to be done," says Janik Wolters, researcher, at Humboldt Universität in Berlin. "We regard our experiment as a milestone on the long road toward on-chip integrated quantum information processing systems, bringing the dream of a quantum computer closer to reality."

Wolters and colleagues present their research in the American Institute of Physics' Applied Physics Letters.

The article, "Enhancement of the zero phonon line emission from a single nitrogen vacancy center in a nanodiamond via coupling to a photonic crystal cavity" by Janik Wolters, Andreas W. Schell, Günter Kewes, Nils Nüsse, Max Schoengen, Henning Döscher, Thomas Hannappel, Bernd Löchel, Michael Barth, and Oliver Benson appears in the journal Applied Physics Letters. See: http://link.aip.org/link/applab/v97/i14/p141108/s1

Journalists may request a free PDF of this article by contacting jbardi@aip.org

ABOUT APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS
Applied Physics Letters, published by the American Institute of Physics, features concise, up-to-date reports on significant new findings in applied physics. Emphasizing rapid dissemination of key data and new physical insights, Applied Physics Letters offers prompt publication of new experimental and theoretical papers bearing on applications of physics phenomena to all branches of science, engineering, and modern technology. Content is published online daily, collected into weekly online and printed issues (52 issues per year). See: http://apl.aip.org/
ABOUT AIP
The American Institute of Physics is a federation of 10 physical science societies representing more than 135,000 scientists, engineers, and educators and is one of the world's largest publishers of scientific information in the physical sciences. Offering partnership solutions for scientific societies and for similar organizations in science and engineering, AIP is a leader in the field of electronic publishing of scholarly journals. AIP publishes 12 journals (some of which are the most highly cited in their respective fields), two magazines, including its flagship publication Physics Today; and the AIP Conference Proceedings series. Its online publishing platform Scitation hosts nearly two million articles from more than 185 scholarly journals and other publications of 28 learned society publishers.

Jason Socrates Bardi | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.aip.org

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