Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Magnetic Shielding of Ion Beam Thruster Walls

15.02.2013
Electric rocket engines known as Hall thrusters, which use a super high-velocity stream of ions to propel a spacecraft in space, have been used successfully onboard many missions for half a century.

Erosion of the discharge channels walls, however, has limited their application to the inner solar system. A research team at Caltech’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in Pasadena, Calif., has found a way to effectively control this erosion by shaping the engine’s magnetic field in a way that shields the walls from ion bombardment.

Ions are produced in Hall thrusters when electrons from an electric current collide with the propellant atoms to form a plasma in the discharge chamber. Thrust is then generated by the interaction of this current with an applied magnetic field that creates a strong electric field. The magnetic field is mostly perpendicular to the channel walls whereas the electric field is mostly parallel to the walls. This electric field then acts as the driving force on the ions, accelerating them to very high speeds (>45,000 mph) toward the exhaust opening. However, the presence of a plasma in the thruster’s discharge chamber leads also to a small component of the electric field parallel to the magnetic field lines.

This component then accelerates some ions toward the discharge chamber (rather than the exhaust opening) causing erosion by sputtering material from the walls. Guided by theory and numerical simulations, the research team designed a thruster configuration in which the effect of the plasma on the magnetic field lines along the walls is minimized, forcing the electric field to be perpendicular to the lines. Based on the numerical predictions, the effect of this magnetic field topology would be to accelerate ions away from walls while also significantly reducing their energy adjacent to the walls. Erosion then would be reduced without degrading propulsive performance. The method now known as magnetic shielding was verified by experiments in a vacuum facility using a modified thruster. The combined results of the simulations and experiments demonstrated that there was 100 to 1,000 times less wall erosion when using magnetic shielding. The results were published in the American Institute of Physics (AIP) journal Applied Physics Letters.

Article: “Magnetic shielding of walls from the unmagnetized ion beam in a Hall thruster” is published in the journal Applied Physics Letters.

Link: http://apl.aip.org/resource/1/applab/v102/i2/p023509_s1

Authors: Ioannis G. Mikellides (1), Ira Katz (1), Richard R. Hofer (1), and Dan M. Goebel (1).

(1) Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California

Catherine Meyers | Newswise
Further information:
http://www.aip.org

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht First direct observation and measurement of ultra-fast moving vortices in superconductors
20.07.2017 | The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

nachricht Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information
19.07.2017 | Universität Basel

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

Leipzig HTP-Forum discusses "hydrothermal processes" as a key technology for a biobased economy

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers create new technique for manipulating polarization of terahertz radiation

20.07.2017 | Information Technology

High-tech sensing illuminates concrete stress testing

20.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

First direct observation and measurement of ultra-fast moving vortices in superconductors

20.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>