Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Light-emitting bubbles captured in the wild

28.02.2017

Physicists from the University of Göttingen image, for the first time, flashes of light emitted by collapsing bubbles in a bubble cloud

High-power ultrasound is used for cleaning surfaces or wastewater as well as for destroying kidney stones. These applications use a curious effect caused when ultrasound enters liquids: bubbles are generated that periodically grow and collapse.


Coloured sonoluminescence of xenon in concentrated sulfuric acid with dissolved sodium salt

University of Göttingen


Light emitting bubbles in a bubble cloud

University of Göttingen

Imploding bubbles compress the gas they contain so strongly that light is emitted from the resulting “hot spot” – a phenomenon called sonoluminescence. At the University of Göttingen, physicists Dr. Carlos Cairós and Dr. Robert Mettin have imaged, for the first time, sonoluminescence flashes together with the bubbles in an ultrasonically driven bubble cloud.

By high-speed video recording with up to 0.5 million images taken per second, light emitting bubbles can be identified and their shapes and oscillations analyzed. The scientists published their work in the journal Physical Review Letters.

While collapse and light emission of isolated bubbles have been well studied before in so-called bubble traps, the Göttingen experiments provide a major step towards understanding sonoluminescence in a more realistic environment of applications of high-power ultrasound: chaotic “wild” ensembles of many moving and interacting bubbles, where collisions and splitting of bubbles frequently occur.

“A particular observation is that the light-emitting bubbles do not need to be perfectly spherical – which would be the optimum shape for the extreme energy focusing in the collapse”, says Dr. Cairós. “Even bubbles pierced by a liquid jet are observed to emit light, a fact that might explain certain chemical reactions in the bubbles.”

The observation technique developed in Göttingen can detect which bubbles in a cloud produce light and can also quantify the intensity. “This photometry of sonoluminiscence may help to optimise applications of high-power ultrasound”, says Dr. Mettin.

The study was conducted in the framework of the “Christian Doppler Laboratory for Cavitation and Micro-Erosion“, a research project funded jointly by the Austrian government and the Austrian-based company Lam Research AG.

The project investigated innovative methods of surface cleaning for the semiconductor industries during the past seven years, in parallel with studying the fundamentals of bubble formation in liquids.

Original publication: Carlos Cairós, Robert Mettin, Simultaneous High-Speed Recording of Sonoluminescence and Bubble Dynamics in Multibubble Fields, Physical Review Letters 118, 064301 (2017), DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.064301, http://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.064301

Notes to editorial teams:
We have posted images to download on this subject at http://www.uni-goettingen.de/en/3240.html?cid=5758

Contact:
Dr. Robert Mettin
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Faculty of Physics – III. Institute
Christian Doppler Laboratory for Cavitation and Micro-Erosion
Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen
Phone: +49 (0)551 39-22285
Mail: robert.mettin@phys.uni-goettingen.de
Website: www.physik3.gwdg.de/~robert/

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.uni-goettingen.de/en/3240.html?cid=5758
http://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.064301

Romas Bielke | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Structured light and nanomaterials open new ways to tailor light at the nanoscale
23.04.2018 | Academy of Finland

nachricht On the shape of the 'petal' for the dissipation curve
23.04.2018 | Lobachevsky University

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Molecules Brilliantly Illuminated

Physicists at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics, which is jointly run by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, have developed a high-power laser system that generates ultrashort pulses of light covering a large share of the mid-infrared spectrum. The researchers envisage a wide range of applications for the technology – in the early diagnosis of cancer, for instance.

Molecules are the building blocks of life. Like all other organisms, we are made of them. They control our biorhythm, and they can also reflect our state of...

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

Im Focus: Basel researchers succeed in cultivating cartilage from stem cells

Stable joint cartilage can be produced from adult stem cells originating from bone marrow. This is made possible by inducing specific molecular processes occurring during embryonic cartilage formation, as researchers from the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the scientific journal PNAS.

Certain mesenchymal stem/stromal cells from the bone marrow of adults are considered extremely promising for skeletal tissue regeneration. These adult stem...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Structured light and nanomaterials open new ways to tailor light at the nanoscale

23.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

On the shape of the 'petal' for the dissipation curve

23.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Clean and Efficient – Fraunhofer ISE Presents Hydrogen Technologies at the HANNOVER MESSE 2018

23.04.2018 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>