Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Göttingen astrophysicists develop European space weather early warning system

11.05.2011
Scientists aim to avert technical disruption in the event of solar storms

Severe solar storms can disrupt the smooth operation of technological systems on earth, or even cause them to fail completely. Electric power outages of longer duration or disruptions of satellite navigation and communication are particularly critical in this context. In the coming years, scientists at Göttingen University are consequently aiming to develop a prototype for a European space weather early warning system.


Development of a solar storm in the corona at the left edge of the sun in the visible spectral range (A) and the connected "sun-tsunami" on the solar disc in the UV spectral range (B). The pictures from different perspectives were taken at the same time by the two satellites of NASA's STEREO mission. Source: Guiseppe Nistico, Institute for Astrophysics, University of Göttingen, and Universita della Calabria, Italy.

Specifically, the early warning system is intended to safeguard the operation of telecommunication and navigation systems on earth. Under the direction of the Göttingen astrophysicist Dr. Volker Bothmer, institutions and enterprises in Germany, Belgium, Norway, the Ukraine and the USA are collaborating. The European Union is granting almost two million euros in support of the project. The entire project funding amounts to more than 2.5 million euros.

Solar storms are a consequence of extremely rapid gas eruptions in the sun’s atmosphere, at speeds of up to ten million kilometres per hour. Within one day these storms can cover the approximately 150 million kilometers to reach the earth, where they become visible in the form of polar lights, for example. The scientists are predicting maximum levels of sun activity for 2012 and 2013. In order to develop an early warning system by that time, they are analysing space weather data from space missions currently in operation: NASA’s STEREO, SDO and ACE missions, ESA’s mission Proba 2, and the international space station ISS. Using model calculations and computer simulations, they aim to forecast the arrival of severe solar storms and their expected impact with the highest possible degree of reliability, so that measures to secure the technology at risk in Europe can be implemented in time. This work is being carried out using high temporal resolution 3D mapping of the distribution of electron density in the earth’s upper atmosphere which the University of Göttingen together with the German Aerospace Centre will be making available online.

In addition to the University of Göttingen, partners in the project “Advanced Forecast For Ensuring Communications Through Space (AFFECTS)” are the German Aerospace Centre in Neustrelitz, the Fraunhofer Institute for Physical Measurement Techniques in Freiburg, the firm Astrium ST in Friedrichshafen, the Planetarium Hamburg, the Royal Observatory of Belgium in Brussels, the Institute of Geophysics of the University of Tromsø in Norway, the Ukrainian Space Research Institute, and the Space Weather Prediction Center of the USA National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The administrative project management will be carried out by the EU Office at the University of Göttingen in cooperation with the project director.

Contact:
Dr. Volker Bothmer
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Fakultät für Physik – lnstitut für Astrophysik
Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen, Germany
Tel.: +49 (0)551 39-5044, Fax: +49 (0)551 39-5043
Email: bothmer@astro.physik.uni-goettingen.de

Dr. Bernd Ebeling | Uni Göttingen
Further information:
http://www.uni-goettingen.de/en/3240.html?cid=3866
http://www.astro.physik.uni-goettingen.de

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Heating quantum matter: A novel view on topology
22.08.2017 | Université libre de Bruxelles

nachricht Engineering team images tiny quasicrystals as they form
18.08.2017 | Cornell University

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Cholesterol-lowering drugs may fight infectious disease

22.08.2017 | Health and Medicine

Meter-sized single-crystal graphene growth becomes possible

22.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

Repairing damaged hearts with self-healing heart cells

22.08.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>