Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Flying High with Cold Quantum Matter

13.09.2010
The European elite in quantum matter research meets in the Tyrolean mountains

In Pardorama, situated 2600 m above sea level, in Ischgl/Tyrol, European researchers in the field of quantum matter will meet to discuss the newest findings in one of the most exciting fields of research. The conference is funded by the European Science Foundation (ESF) and deals with the particular nature of ultracold quantum matter.

In the last few years, ultracold quantum matter has become one of the most fascinating fields of research in physics. Experimental physicist are now able to control or tune single particles or clouds of particles experimentally in such a way that they can observe new states of matter, which have so far been predicted in theory only. For example, scientists have succeeded in merging atoms at a temperature close to absolute zero to form molecules and transferring these molecules to a Bose-Einstein condensate. In this new state of matter all particles behave in the same way, forming a single quantum object. These experiments not only provide new insights into the physical properties of matter but also open up new exciting possibilities of applications such as high-precision measurement tools and quantum computation.

From Monday to Thursday, about 200 scientists coming from Europe, USA, Australia and other countries meet at the conference in Ischgl. Prof. Deborah Jin from the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics (JILA) of the University of Colorado, Boulder and leading researcher in the field of ultracold quantum matter will open the conference with a key note speech. “A large part of the research community is assembled at this conference, and we will discuss and review current questions and future prospects for research,“ says Rudolf Grimm, head of the newly founded Physics Research Center at the University of Innsbruck and organizer of the EuroQUAM conference. “This is an important moment for this relatively young and highly complex field of research.”

Under the project EuroQUAM, which connects theoretical and experimental research, leading European research groups in quantum matter are linked. “In this network, we can take advantage of the entire European potential in this seminal field of research,” says an excited Rudolf Grimm about the cross-border collaboration. The 3-year project is funded under the EUROCORES program by the European Science Foundation. The EuroQUAM concluding conference taking place in Ischgl/Tyrol is organized by the Physics Research Center of the University of Innsbruck and the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (IQOQI) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

The European Science Foundation (ESF) is an independent, non-governmental organization promoting collaboration in scientific research, research funding and science policy across Europe. Established in 1974, it represents 79 national funding bodies, research institutions, academies and scientific societies from 30 countries. The ESF serves as a common platform for cross-border cooperation in Europe and has made major contributions to science on a global scale. EUROCORES is an ESF program promoting interdisciplinary collaboration of European, American and Canadian researchers within the framework of interdisciplinary joint research projects.

Weitere Informationen:
http://iqoqi.at/euroquam2010 - Conference Website
http://iqoqi.at - Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (IQOQI)
http://www.esf.org - European Science Foundation (ESF)
Contact:
Prof. Rudolf Grimm
Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information
Austrian Academy of Sciences
Technikerstraße 21a, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
Phone: +43 512 507-6300 od. 4760
Email: rudolf.grimm@oeaw.ac.at
http://www.ultracold.at
Dr. Christian Flatz
Public Relations
Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information
Austrian Academy of Sciences
Technikerstraße 21a, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
Phone: +43 650 5777122
Email: pr-iqoqi@oeaw.ac.at

Dr. Christian Flatz | idw
Further information:
http://www.ultracold.at
http://www.esf.org

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht From rocks in Colorado, evidence of a 'chaotic solar system'
23.02.2017 | University of Wisconsin-Madison

nachricht Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars
22.02.2017 | Carnegie Institution for Science

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>