Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Exploding star shines brighter

15.06.2011
Researchers at Stockholm University have studied the exploding star Supernova 1987A. In an article published in Nature, they present findings that show, among other things, that the supernova has entered a new phase of shining ever more brightly.

“Our study shows that the luminosity declined until about 2001 owing to radioactive disintegration of compounds formed by the explosion. Over the last ten years, however, it began to shine more brightly again,” says Josefin Larsson at the Department of Astronomy.


Caption The images were captured in the red segment of the visible spectrum. However, the colours were added afterward and do not correspond to what we would see with our eyes. Different scales were used for the ring and the rest of the image to make details stand out more clearly. Stockholm university

“In the article we show that the increase is a result of x-ray radiation from the surrounding gas ring shining on the supernova. The change in the dominant energy source marks the transition from a supernova to what we call a supernova remnant.”

A supernova is the extremely bright explosion that occurs when a star of high density dies. The outer parts of the star are slung outward, while the innermost part forms a neutron star or a black hole. In the explosion, heavy elements are formed that subsequently come to be parts of new stars and planets.

”Supernova 1987A exploded in our neighbouring galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud roughly 24 years ago. Since the supernova is so close, we have been able to study the consequences of the explosion with great precision for a long time with the aid of the Hubble Space Telescope,” says Larsson.

Images of Supernova 1987A taken with the Hubble Space Telescope between 1994 and 2009 show that what is shining in the middle are the remains of the star that exploded, while the ring consists of gas emitted from the star tens of thousands of years prior to the explosion. It can clearly be seen how the material that was sent out in the explosion is expanding and changing in luminosity over time.

The scientists from Stockholm University that took part in the project are Josefin Larsson, Claes Fransson, Göran Östlin, Per Gröningsson, Anders Jerkstrand, Cecilia Kozma, Jesper Sollerman, and Peter Lundqvist.

Further information
Josefin Larsson at the Department of Astronomy, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, phone: +46 (0)8-5537 8512, e-mail josefin.larsson@astro.su.se
Weitere Informationen:
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature10090.html (Article in nature: X-ray illumination of the ejecta of supernova 1987A)

Viktor Sandqvist | idw
Further information:
http://www.vr.se
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature10090.html

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Abrupt motion sharpens x-ray pulses
28.07.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik

nachricht Physicists Design Ultrafocused Pulses
27.07.2017 | Universität Innsbruck

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Abrupt motion sharpens x-ray pulses

Spectrally narrow x-ray pulses may be “sharpened” by purely mechanical means. This sounds surprisingly, but a team of theoretical and experimental physicists developed and realized such a method. It is based on fast motions, precisely synchronized with the pulses, of a target interacting with the x-ray light. Thereby, photons are redistributed within the x-ray pulse to the desired spectral region.

A team of theoretical physicists from the MPI for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg has developed a novel method to intensify the spectrally broad x-ray...

Im Focus: Physicists Design Ultrafocused Pulses

Physicists working with researcher Oriol Romero-Isart devised a new simple scheme to theoretically generate arbitrarily short and focused electromagnetic fields. This new tool could be used for precise sensing and in microscopy.

Microwaves, heat radiation, light and X-radiation are examples for electromagnetic waves. Many applications require to focus the electromagnetic fields to...

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New 3-D imaging reveals how human cell nucleus organizes DNA and chromatin of its genome

28.07.2017 | Health and Medicine

Heavy metals in water meet their match

28.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Oestrogen regulates pathological changes of bones via bone lining cells

28.07.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>