Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

ESA awarded by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

26.01.2009
Based on a cooperative agreement, ESA has been delivering data from ALOS – Japan's four-tonne Earth Observation satellite – to users across Europe and Africa since its launch three years ago. ESA’s efforts have been recognised by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency with an award of appreciation.

Dr Yasushi Horikawa, Executive Director of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), wrote to ESA to express appreciation for its "significant contribution over the last 8 years in the planning, implementation, and operation of the ALOS Data Node framework."

The agreement between the two space agencies puts ESA in charge of the ALOS European Data Node (ADEN), delivering the satellite’s data to scientific and operational users across Europe and Africa.

Within the ADEN network, ESA, JAXA and other partners cooperate to produce a wide range of environmental datasets. Applications include the domains of forestry, global carbon monitoring, oceanography, sea-ice monitoring, agriculture and vegetation monitoring, topography and disaster mitigation.

"This framework has proven to be a highly effective and efficient mechanism for realising the vision of a global, distributed data system for a new generation of Earth Observing missions – a new paradigm for coordination among space nations," Horikawa wrote.

Volker Liebig, ESA’s Director for Earth Observation Programmes, said: "ESA is very honoured to be recognised for its participation in the ALOS Node cooperation. We are looking forward to continuing our successful collaboration with JAXA on future space missions."

ALOS (Advanced Land Observing Satellite), launched on 24 January 2006 from the Tanegashima Space Centre in Japan, was initially intended to operate for three years. However, given the overall standing of the satellite and the quality data it is delivering, JAXA has extended its mission until 2010 and has begun preparations for an additional extension until 2013.

ESA is supporting ALOS as a 'Third Party Mission', which means ESA utilises its multi-mission European ground infrastructure and expertise to acquire, process and distribute data from the satellite to its wide user community. To date, ESA has delivered ALOS data to more than 270 research and application projects, serving some 500 users.

A wealth of new applications has been developed over the last three years using data from ALOS’ three onboard instruments.

Its Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) can acquire observations during both day and night and through any weather conditions. PALSAR data are also complementing ESA’s radar missions, such as Envisat and ERS-2, and the European National X-band missions, such as the German TerraSAR-X and Italian Cosmo Skymed constellation.

The Panchromatic Remote-sensing Instrument of Stereo Mapping (PRISM) onboard ALOS can observe selected areas in three dimensions, down to a high 2.5-metre spatial resolution. The Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer type-2 (AVNIR-2) charts land cover and vegetation in visible and near infrared spectral bands.

European and international users recently delivered results of ALOS data exploitation at the 2nd PI Symposium organised by ESA with JAXA and other Node partners.

"The results presented show that the investment of the ESA Member States for ALOS as part of ESA’s Earth Observation Envelope Programme have brought a significant benefit for the European user community for a large variety of applications," ESA’s Third Party Mission Manager Bianca Hoersch said.

The development and implementation of the ALOS cooperation between JAXA and ESA has provided a good framework and very promising perspectives for cooperation with JAXA on future Earth Observation missions. Currently, JAXA and ESA are setting up a new cooperation agreement for JAXA’s GOSAT mission, which was launched earlier today.

GOSAT’s mission is to observe the concentration of greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide and methane, which cause global warming.

Mariangela D'Acunto | alfa
Further information:
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMJP5WPXPF_index_0.html

Further reports about: AEROSPACE ALOS ESA Earth's magnetic field Exploration JAXA Observing PALSAR greenhouse gas

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Electrocatalysis can advance green transition
23.01.2017 | Technical University of Denmark

nachricht Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin
23.01.2017 | Ferdinand-Braun-Institut Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis

23.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

Electrocatalysis can advance green transition

23.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New technology for mass-production of complex molded composite components

23.01.2017 | Process Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>