Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Data storage: Magnetic memories

03.02.2012
Magnetic random-access memory based on new spin transfer technology achieves higher storage density by packing multiple bits of data into each memory cell.
Solid-state memory is seeing an increase in demand due to the emergence of portable devices such as tablet computers and smart phones. Spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) is a new type of solid-state memory that uses electrical currents to read and write data that are stored on magnetic moment of electrons. Rachid Sbiaa and co-workers at the A*STAR Data Storage Institute1 have now enhanced the storage density of STT-MRAM by packing multiple bits of information into each of its memory cells.

"As a technology, STT-MRAM has several advantages," says Sbiaa. "They have high read and write speed, low power consumption, great endurance, and are easy to integrate with standard semiconductor-processing technologies." Further increasing the storage density remains a challenge, however, because the write current needs to be increased to keep the bit thermally stable. A solution to overcome this problem is to use memory cells that can hold multiple bits, but scientists have yet to achieve the electrical control needed for this kind of STT-MRAM.

Essentially, STT-MRAM reads and writes information by passing currents through multiple magnetic thin films. Information is written if the magnetic moment of electrons in the current, or spin, is aligned in one preferable direction. The torque by these aligned spins on the magnetic layers can be strong enough to switch the magnetic direction of the layers to the direction set by the current.

Reading information is done through the measurement of electrical resistance of the device, which depends on whether the magnetizations of the soft and hard magnetic layers are aligned in parallel or opposite directions relative to each other. The hard magnetic layer is designed in such a way that its magnetism cannot be switched by electric currents.

To store two bits, the researchers have now added a second soft magnetic layer. These two soft magnets are slightly different, one being ‘harder’ than the other, and can therefore be switched independently by a suitable choice of electrical current. In this way four possible combinations for the magnetic states can be addressed by electrical currents, corresponding to two bits of information (see image).

Furthermore, the researchers introduced magnetic layers polarized in the in-plane direction that enhance the torque effect and thereby reduce the overall electrical current required to write information.

In the future, the researchers plan to use a different device design based on electrons ‘tunnelling’ across an insulating layer. "These magnetic tunnel junctions provide a higher read signal than for a giant magnetoresistance-type device," says Sbiaa.

Enhanced magnetic storage devices. An electrical current passing through a stack of magnetic layers (left) is used to write and read magnetic information. The relative orientation of the soft magnetic layers encodes up to four bits (right).

The A*STAR-affiliated researchers contributing to this research are from the Data Storage Institute

Lee Swee Heng | Research asia research news
Further information:
http://www.a-star.edu.sg
http://www.researchsea.com

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Tune your radio: galaxies sing while forming stars
21.02.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie

nachricht Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms
17.02.2017 | Universität Konstanz

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Impacts of mass coral die-off on Indian Ocean reefs revealed

21.02.2017 | Earth Sciences

Novel breast tomosynthesis technique reduces screening recall rate

21.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Use your Voice – and Smart Homes will “LISTEN”

21.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>