Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

CHRIS satellite imager celebrates 7 years’ scientific success

10.11.2008
The scientific community is celebrating 7 years of high resolution hyperspectral satellite imagery from the highly successful CHRIS multi-spectral payload imager.

The instrument has been so successful that an advanced variant is under development, offering new functionality for Earth observation missions in a wide range of applications in resource monitoring and mapping, environmental science and security.

CHRIS (Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) was developed by SSTL's Optical Payload Group (formerly Sira Space Group), and placed into orbit in October 2001 on the PROBA mission developed by the European Space Agency (ESA). The sophisticated optical earth imaging instrument recently passed its 7th year in orbit as the highest resolution civil hyperspectral instrument in space.

Data from CHRIS has been highly successful in development of new Earth observation applications, and is supporting 94 international Principal Investigators (PIs), acquiring images from over 240 sites in 43 countries for diverse scientific research.

Dr. Mike Cutter, SSTL Optical Payloads Group explained the importance and value of such instrumentation, "Hyperspectral instruments have been widely used on aircraft for mineral prospecting and resource management and the CHRIS instruments enable this capability to be used on a national and continental scale, which is critical both for efficient management of natural resources and for providing the information to determine the effects of climate change and mitigation measures."

SSTL’s subsidiary DMCii schedules and processes images captured by CHRIS for ESA. The data from the mission then used in a wide range of applications including land cover assessment, resource management, deforestation and forest management, precision farming, aerosol monitoring and water quality assessment. The mission also supports International Charter: Space and Major Disasters campaigns by providing high resolution optical imagery of disaster affected areas.

The CHRIS hyperspectral images have been in high demand over the past 7 years, and the PROBA / CHRIS mission has pioneered and validated techniques for future scientific and commercial imaging spectrometer missions. Another reason for the scientific demand is that images can be acquired at 5 different view angles for each site, on a single over pass, allowing both spectral and directional signatures to be captured.

The new, more advanced CHRIS-2 instrument expands upon this unique capability by including the short wave infra-red band (SWIR), which allows further valuable applications to be addressed including mineralogy, prospecting, crop health and pollution monitoring.

Hyperspectral imagers split the available light from a scene into a large range of channels, providing detailed information about the imagery content. Whereas the CHRIS instrument provided up to 62 channels in the visible band, the CHRIS-2 instrument extends this capability to over 200 bands, including the short-wave infra-red bands (SWIR). Placing such an instrument on a spacecraft provides global reach and supports national and international routine imaging campaigns efficiently.

SSTL will provide the CHRIS-2 instrument on future Earth observation missions or as a stand-alone payload for integration with third party satellite platforms.

Robin Wolstenholme | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ballard.co.uk/sstl/
http://www.ballard.co.uk/press_releases/company_releases.aspx?story=1306

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time
17.10.2017 | University of Maryland

nachricht Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging
17.10.2017 | American Association for the Advancement of Science

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Ocean atmosphere rife with microbes

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

Neutrons observe vitamin B6-dependent enzyme activity useful for drug development

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

NASA finds newly formed tropical storm lan over open waters

17.10.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>