Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Black Hole Research Lands NASA EPSCoR Grant

27.08.2008
Researchers from Arkansas land $1.4 million grant to pursue study of super-massive black holes thought to reside at the center of all galaxies.

Dr. Marc Seigar, a UALR astrophysics professor and three colleagues from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, have received a $1.4 million grant from the Arkansas NASA EPSCoR Office to further their study of mysterious super- massive black holes thought to reside at the centers of nearly all galaxies.

Seigar and his co-researchers – Professors Daniel Kennefick, Julia Kennefick, and Claud Lacy, all of the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville – formed a new collaboration in late 2007 to study these black holes and the role they play in galactic evolution. In June of this year, Seigar presented the groups' conclusions at the American Astronomical Society meeting in St. Louis that created a worldwide buzz among science journalists.

Operating as the Arkansas Galaxy Evolution Survey – AGES, the scientific collaborative has received a total of $1.4 million, with the Arkansas NASA EPSCoR Office funding half of that amount and the two universities providing the remainder of the funds.

Seigar at UALR will receive approximately $400,000 and the three other Fayetteville scientists will receive the remainder of the funds. Daniel Kennefick will be the grant's principal investigator.

The grant will allow the Arkansas scientists to develop a census of black holes throughout the universe as a means of understanding how galaxies and the universe itself evolved with time.

In June of this year, Seigar presented a paper to the American Astronomical Society in St. Louis outlining AGES' method of estimating the masses of super-massive black holes in galaxies that are far distant. The team's work attracted the interest of science journalists as well as National Geographic, USA Today, Science News, and BBC's Sky at Night among others.

Seigar and his research team have concluded that the larger the black hole at the center of a spiral galaxy, the tighter the galaxy's arms wrap around itself. If correct, the simple relationship would give researchers an easy way to learn about black holes.

The research team will employ new techniques to estimate the masses of the super-massive black holes residing in large numbers of galaxies by exploiting a relation that they discovered between a spiral arm structure and the mass of the super-massive black hole in the center of spiral galaxies.

The technique will permit them to make use of the extensive archive of deep images provided by large telescopes, such as NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, in estimating the masses of super-massive black holes in distant galaxies.

In addition, the team will use spectroscopic techniques to estimate the mass of super-massive black holes in quasars, and other "active" galaxies, in which the super-massive black hole is surrounded by matter swirling into it.

They will also use infrared and X-ray techniques to look for evidence of binary super-massive black holes in galaxies where the birth of large numbers of hot bright stars indicates a fairly recent galactic merger.

"Such a merger seems likely to give birth to a binary super-massive black hole system at the heart of the merged galaxy, and such systems could ultimately be very strong sources of gravitational waves detectable by the proposed NASA mission to fly a gravitational wave detector in space, known as LISA," Kennefick said.

The AGES collaboration has discovered four candidate galaxies that may contain super-massive black holes binaries.

The grant they have been awarded will pay for graduate and undergraduate students at both Universities to participate in this research. In addition it will bring two postdoctoral researchers to Arkansas to work on this survey, one to UALR and the other to UA Fayetteville.

Joan I. Duffy | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.ualr.edu/

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht From rocks in Colorado, evidence of a 'chaotic solar system'
23.02.2017 | University of Wisconsin-Madison

nachricht Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars
22.02.2017 | Carnegie Institution for Science

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>