Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Women with high blood pressure get different treatment to men

14.10.2014

Women who are treated for high blood pressure are not given the same medication as men, nor do they hit the treatment targets as often, reveals a thesis from the University of Gothenburg.

Around a third of Sweden's adult population is affected by high blood pressure, which is one of the most common risk factor for cardiovascular events such as stroke, heart failure and heart attack in both women and men.


Women with high blood pressure get different treatment to men

University of Gothenburg

A thesis from the University of Gothenburg's Sahlgrenska Academy looks at 40,825 patients treated for high blood pressure in primary care. It shows that women and men are prescribed different medication to bring down their blood pressure. Women are also less likely than men to hit the general treatment target of blood pressure below 140/90 mm Hg, which is the threshold for high blood pressure.

Different medication
The thesis shows that women are more often prescribed diuretic medication while men are given ACE inhibitors (which block an enzyme in the kidneys).

"International guidelines recommend that patients with both high blood pressure and diabetes be treated with ACE inhibitors," says doctoral student and medical doctor Charlotta Ljungman, author of the thesis. "But our study shows that women are less likely to be given this treatment. What's more, this discrepancy can't be explained away by differences in other concurrent cardiovascular disorders."

Age a factor
The thesis also shows that the differences in treatment between women and men are greater in patients with limited education. The fact that women are less likely to reach the target blood pressure is partly because they are generally older when diagnosed with high blood pressure.

"But this shouldn't make a difference, as previous studies have shown that older patients with high blood pressure also benefit considerably from treatment to lower their blood pressure, not least to prevent the development of disorders such as stroke, dementia and heart failure," says Charlotta Ljungman.

Underestimates the risk
Women are generally less likely to be affected by cardiovascular disease, and also succumb later in life. Charlotta Ljungman believes that this could be one of the reasons why the healthcare system underestimates the risk of future cardiovascular disease in women.

"The key thing when treating high blood pressure is to reach target blood pressure," says Charlotta Ljungman. "The fact that women do so less often than men is remarkable, and steps must be taken to improve treatment."

The thesis Treatment of hypertension in women and men was publicly defended on 19 September.

Link to thesis: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/35942

For further information, please contact:
Charlotta Ljungman, doctoral student at the Sahlgrenska Academy and cardiologist at Sahlgrenska University Hospital
+46 (0)31 342 7589
charlotta.ljungman@vgregion.se

Lead supervisor: Karin Manhem, professor and consultant, karin.manhem@vgregion.se

Weitere Informationen:

http://sahlgrenska.gu.se/english/news_and_events/news/News_Detail/women-with-hig...

Krister Svahn | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht One gene closer to regenerative therapy for muscular disorders
01.06.2017 | Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

nachricht The gut microbiota plays a key role in treatment with classic diabetes medication
01.06.2017 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Quantum thermometer or optical refrigerator?

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

A 100-year-old physics problem has been solved at EPFL

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Equipping form with function

23.06.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>