Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Walking often and far reduces risks in heart patients

13.05.2009
Study highlights:
  • Walking longer at a slower pace improved heart health much more effectively than standard cardiac rehabilitation of walking a shorter distance at a brisker pace in overweight patients with coronary heart disease.
  • In this study, moderate-pace walking for 45–60 minutes on five to six days was considered high-calorie-burning exercise.
  • Researchers said it’s necessary to modify traditional rehabilitation because more heart patients are overweight.

An exercise program that burns a lot of calories reduced cardiac risk factors better than standard cardiac rehabilitation in overweight coronary patients, researchers report in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

“The higher-caloric exercise, consisting of almost daily long-distance walking, resulted in double the weight loss and a greater fat mass loss than standard cardiac rehabilitation exercise,” said Philip A. Ades, M.D., lead author of the study and professor of medicine and director of cardiac rehabilitation and prevention at the University of Vermont College of Medicine in Burlington. “And probably most importantly, these patients improved their insulin sensitivity to a greater degree.”

The high-calorie expenditure regime was not more intensive than rehabilitation, but longer duration at lower intensity on more days.

In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers randomized 74 overweight cardiac rehabilitation patients (average age 64, 20 percent women) to either a high-caloric expenditure exercise regimen intended to burn 3,000 to 3,500 calories a week or a standard rehab therapy burning 700 to 800 calories weekly.

After five months, compared to the group doing traditional rehabilitation, patients in the high-calorie-burning group had:

• significantly greater improvement in 10 heart risk factors, including insulin sensitivity (a hallmark of the metabolic syndrome), total cholesterol and the total cholesterol/good cholesterol ratio, blood pressure, and cardio-respiratory fitness; and

• a greater average reduction in weight (18 vs. 8 pounds), body fat, (13 vs. 6 pounds) and waistlines (2.7 vs. 2 inches).

Researchers said all of these changes were statistically significant.

“Cardiac rehab has essentially remained the same since the 1970s because it has a mortality benefit,” Ades said. “But it doesn’t burn many calories and things have changed. Eighty percent of our rehabilitation patients are now overweight and many of them are becoming diabetic. It’s a different time in terms of what we need to do in cardiac rehab.”

Excessive weight increases the risk of heart attacks and is associated with an increase in other heart risks factors, including high cholesterol, hypertension and diabetes.

High-calorie-expenditure exercise consisted of walking for 45 to 60 minutes a day at a moderate pace – a lower speed than standard therapy – for five to six days a week. Standard rehabilitation involved walking, biking or rowing for 25 to 40 minutes at a brisker pace three times a week.

While standard rehabilitation has benefit, the high-calorie-burning exercise increased the benefit, which is crucial with the increasing prevalence of obesity, researchers noted.

The study’s message is “walk often and walk far.”

However, Ades said cardiac patients require supervision by medical staff.

“Since they were walking at a lower intensity, we were comfortable with them doing it on their own,” Ades said. “We suspect that the general applicability of the high-caloric expenditure exercise programs in cardiac rehabilitation will be broad, although staff and patients will need to be comfortable with performing much of the five- to six-day-per-week exercise program away from the highly monitored rehab facility.”

The two groups were similar at baseline in age, gender, body weight and fat distribution.

After five months, the patients were left more on their own to continue their exercise programs, which most did.

“If you start patients in this program with the proper support, and you start getting positive results, it is surprising to me how well it is accepted,” Ades said. “The amount of exercise wasn’t the problem; and the fact that they where losing weight supported the behavior change.”

One year after entering the study, both groups had regained a few pounds from their five-month weights, an average of 2.9 pounds for the high-exercise group and two pounds for the low-exercise patients, not a significant difference between the two. However, weight and body fat remained significantly lower in both groups.

Researchers are following the participants to determine whether high-calorie exercise improves the incidence of death and disability.

Co-authors are Patrick D. Savage, M.S.; Michael J. Toth, Ph.D.; Jean Harvey-Berino, Ph.D., R.D.; David J. Schneider, M.D.; Janice Y. Bunn, Ph.D.; Marie C. Audelin, M.D.; and Maryann Ludlow, R.D. Individual author disclosures can be found on the manuscript.

The study was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the General Clinical Research Center at the University of Vermont College of Medicine.

Editor’s Note: The American Heart Association’s Start! initiative encourages all Americans to participate in regular physical activity. Start! created personalized walking plans for people at any fitness level. Visit www.twalkingnow.org to download the Start! Walking Plans and locate Start! Walking Paths near you.

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association’s policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.americanheart.org/corporatefunding.

Bridgette McNeill | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.americanheart.org/corporatefunding

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Hot cars can hit deadly temperatures in as little as one hour
24.05.2018 | Arizona State University

nachricht 3D images of cancer cells in the body: Medical physicists from Halle present new method
16.05.2018 | Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Powerful IT security for the car of the future – research alliance develops new approaches

The more electronics steer, accelerate and brake cars, the more important it is to protect them against cyber-attacks. That is why 15 partners from industry and academia will work together over the next three years on new approaches to IT security in self-driving cars. The joint project goes by the name Security For Connected, Autonomous Cars (SecForCARs) and has funding of €7.2 million from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Infineon is leading the project.

Vehicles already offer diverse communication interfaces and more and more automated functions, such as distance and lane-keeping assist systems. At the same...

Im Focus: Molecular switch will facilitate the development of pioneering electro-optical devices

A research team led by physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed molecular nanoswitches that can be toggled between two structurally different states using an applied voltage. They can serve as the basis for a pioneering class of devices that could replace silicon-based components with organic molecules.

The development of new electronic technologies drives the incessant reduction of functional component sizes. In the context of an international collaborative...

Im Focus: LZH showcases laser material processing of tomorrow at the LASYS 2018

At the LASYS 2018, from June 5th to 7th, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) will be showcasing processes for the laser material processing of tomorrow in hall 4 at stand 4E75. With blown bomb shells the LZH will present first results of a research project on civil security.

At this year's LASYS, the LZH will exhibit light-based processes such as cutting, welding, ablation and structuring as well as additive manufacturing for...

Im Focus: Self-illuminating pixels for a new display generation

There are videos on the internet that can make one marvel at technology. For example, a smartphone is casually bent around the arm or a thin-film display is rolled in all directions and with almost every diameter. From the user's point of view, this looks fantastic. From a professional point of view, however, the question arises: Is that already possible?

At Display Week 2018, scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP will be demonstrating today’s technological possibilities and...

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

In focus: Climate adapted plants

25.05.2018 | Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

In focus: Climate adapted plants

25.05.2018 | Event News

Flow probes from the 3D printer

25.05.2018 | Machine Engineering

Less is more? Gene switch for healthy aging found

25.05.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>