Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Ventilation changes could double number of lungs available for transplant: study

15.12.2010
Many potential donor lungs deteriorate

Simple changes to how ventilators are used could almost double the number of lungs available for transplants, according to new international research involving a doctor at St. Michael's Hospital.

Many potential donor lungs deteriorate between the time a patient is declared brain dead and the time the lungs are evaluated to determine whether they are suitable for transplant. The study involving Dr. Arthur Slutsky, the hospital's vice president of research, said the deterioration could be in part because of the ventilatory strategy used while potential donors were observed just prior to being declared brain dead.

His team, lead by Dr. Marco Ranieri of the University of Turin in Italy, tested a "lung protective strategy" on patients in 12 hospitals in Spain and Italy that resulted in a significant increase in the number of viable donor lungs that were transplanted. Their results are published in the current issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The strategy involved using smaller "tidal volumes," meaning less air was pumped into the lungs with each breath, to prevent injury to the lungs. It also used higher "positive-end expiratory pressure," the amount of pressure applied by the ventilator at the end of an exhalation, to prevent lungs from collapsing.

"A lot of patients who are waiting for lung transplants die before they get a transplant because there aren't enough organs," said Dr. Slutsky, the only Canadian on the research team. "By using this lung protective strategy, one can essentially double the number of lungs available for transplant."

The randomized study involved 118 patients. Of the 59 patients treated with conventional ventilation, 32 (54 per cent) met lung donor eligibility criteria. Of those on the lung protective strategy, 56 (95 per cent) met the criteria. Ultimately, double the number of lungs was transplanted in the group treated with the lung protective strategy.

According to the Canadian Institute for Health Information, 1,222 lung transplants were performed in Canada between 1997 and 2006, but 299 people died while waiting for a transplant. There were 252 people waiting to receive lung transplants in 2006, up from 119 in 1997.

"This is pretty simple and easy to implement," Dr. Slutsky said. "It's not like a fancy new drug or equipment. You just have to change the ventilator a little bit."

Dr. Slutsky said some doctors and hospitals may already be following a similar "lung protective strategy" but this is the first published randomized clinical trial showing it works, which could lead to standards that all hospitals would follow.

"If this is adopted widely, we think it will increase the number of lungs available for transplant, increase the quality of life for some people and probably save the lives of some people who are on the waiting list," he said.

About St. Michael's Hospital:

St. Michael's Hospital provides compassionate care to all who enter its doors. The Hospital also provides outstanding medical education to future health care professionals in more than 23 academic disciplines. Critical care and trauma, heart disease, neurosurgery, diabetes, cancer care, and care of the homeless are among the Hospital's recognized areas of expertise. Through the Keenan Research Centre and the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, research at St. Michael's Hospital is recognized and put into practice around the world. Founded in 1892, the Hospital is fully affiliated with the University of Toronto.

Leslie Shepherd | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.smh.ca

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Serious children’s infections also spreading in Switzerland
26.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht New vaccine production could improve flu shot accuracy
25.07.2017 | Duke University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Serious children’s infections also spreading in Switzerland

26.07.2017 | Health and Medicine

Biomarkers for identifying Tumor Aggressiveness

26.07.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>