Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Vanderbilt scientists report first effective medical therapy for rare stomach disorder

27.11.2009
A drug used to treat colorectal cancer also can reverse a rare stomach disorder and should be considered first-line therapy for the disease, researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center report this week.

Ménétrier's disease causes thickening of the stomach lining, severe abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, as well as anemia and swelling in the feet and ankles due to protein loss. Patients are at increased risk for gastric cancer. Previously, the only effective treatment was gastrectomy – surgical removal of the stomach.

The targeted cancer drug cetuximab, brand name Erbitux, relieved symptoms of severe Ménétrier's disease in seven patients who completed a one-month course of treatment. Four of them showed near-complete remission, the Vanderbilt researchers report in the Nov. 25 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine.

"We have identified the first effective medical therapy for this disorder," said Robert Coffey, M.D., Ingram Professor of Cancer Research and the paper's senior author.

Erbitux is a monoclonal antibody that blocks the binding of transforming growth factor-alpha, or TGF-alpha, a signaling protein, to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Patients with Ménétrier's disease have abnormally high levels of TGF-alpha.

In studies dating back 20 years, Coffey and his colleagues found that TGF-alpha causes proliferation of the stomach lining and stimulates mucous production while suppressing acid secretion. Transgenic mice that over-express TGF-alpha in the stomach exhibit all of the hallmarks of Ménétrier's disease.

The current study involved nine patients who were considering gastrectomy. Two patients dropped out of the study, but the rest experienced significant relief of symptoms within hours or days after beginning treatment. All seven continued taking the drug after the monthlong study ended.

Of the four patients who experienced near-complete remission of the disease, one of them, and the other three patients in the study, later underwent gastrectomy. Two patients are no longer taking the drug, and one of them has a normal stomach and remains symptom-free two years later, Coffey said.

The paper's first author is Haley Fiske, M.D., MPH, assistant professor in the Division of Gastroenterology.

Other co-authors: Jarred Tanksley, Ki Taek Nam, Ph.D., James Goldenring, M.D., Ph.D., Robbert Slebos, Ph.D., Daniel Liebler, Ph.D., Amir Abtahi, Bonnie La Fleur, Ph.D., Gregory Ayers, Christopher Lind, M.D., and Mary Washington, M.D., Ph.D.

Bill Snyder | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.vanderbilt.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Plasmonic biosensors enable development of new easy-to-use health tests
14.12.2017 | Aalto University

nachricht ASU scientists develop new, rapid pipeline for antimicrobials
14.12.2017 | Arizona State University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Plasmonic biosensors enable development of new easy-to-use health tests

14.12.2017 | Health and Medicine

New type of smart windows use liquid to switch from clear to reflective

14.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

BigH1 -- The key histone for male fertility

14.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>