Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Van Andel Research Institute Finding Could Lead to Reduced Side Effects in Anti-Cancer Antibiotics

29.06.2011
Finding could lead to new and improved drugs for several types of cancer

Most of us have had a doctor prescribe an antibiotic for a stubborn bacterial infection, or for a cut that gets infected. However, prescribing an antibiotic to fight cancer? In fact, anti-cancer antibiotics have been used since the 1950s to successfully treat several forms of cancer, but often the side effects limit the duration they can be given to a patient.

One particularly promising anti-cancer antibiotic is Geldanamycin and a modified form of this drug known as 17AAG. Despite its proven ability to selectively kill many different forms of cancer in laboratory studies, the use of these drugs is limited due to side effects, mainly liver failure, in patients.

Newly published results from Van Andel Research Institute (VARI) researchers have determined how the anti-cancer antibiotic Geldanamycin and its derivative 17AAG work in more detail and have uncovered a possible explanation for side effects observed in clinical trials of the drug.

"The article provides novel and significant information about the clinical potential of these compounds in cancer therapy," said Yale School of Medicine Professor and Chair of Pharmacology Joseph Schlessinger, Ph.D.

Although there was much preclinical interest in the antibiotic Geldanamycin as an anti-cancer drug, it turned out to be a poor candidate for clinical trials because of its toxicity. Derivatives such as 17AAG were developed to decrease toxicity and are still being evaluated in clinical trials.

VARI researchers determined how Geldanamycin and 17AAG work in more detail in a study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A., which could inform future drug design, and also found a way to potentially decrease the antibiotics’ toxicity.

“There was so much interest early on in Geldanamycin because it resulted in the degradation of oncoproteins, important protein targets in tumor cells,” said VARI Research Scientist and lead author of the paper Qian Xie, M.D., Ph.D.

“If there is a chance of decreasing the toxicity of Geldanamycin and 17AAG, it would be a boon in the treatment of cancer,” said George Vande Woude, Ph.D., head of the Laboratory of Molecular Oncology at VARI that published the study.

About Van Andel Institute
Established by Jay and Betty Van Andel in 1996, Van Andel Institute (VAI) is an independent research and educational organization based in Grand Rapids, Mich., dedicated to preserving, enhancing and expanding the frontiers of medical science, and to achieving excellence in education by probing fundamental issues of education and the learning process. Van Andel Education Institute (VAEI) is dedicated to strengthening science education and preparing and motivating individuals to pursue science or science-related professions. Van Andel Research Institute (VARI), the research arm of VAI, is dedicated to probing the genetic, cellular and molecular origins of cancer, Parkinson’s and other diseases and working to translate those findings into effective therapies. This is accomplished through the work of over 200 researchers in 18 on-site laboratories and in collaborative partnerships that span the globe. VARI is affiliated with the Translational Genomics Research Institute, (TGen), of Phoenix, Arizona.

Joe Gavan | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.vai.org

Further reports about: 17AAG Anti-Cancer Antibiotics Geldanamycin VAI anti-cancer antibiotics

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties
23.02.2017 | Vanderbilt University

nachricht Researchers identify cause of hereditary skeletal muscle disorder
22.02.2017 | Klinikum der Universität München

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties

23.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

Light-driven reaction converts carbon dioxide into fuel

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Oil and gas wastewater spills alter microbes in West Virginia waters

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>