Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

UA Researchers Find Culprit Behind Skeletal Muscle Disease

29.01.2014
A University of Arizona doctoral candidate has shown for the first time that genetic mutations in the titin gene can cause skeletal muscle myopathy, a disease in which muscle fibers do not function properly, resulting in muscle weakness. Myopathic disease can affect heart muscles as well as skeletal muscles, and titin is responsible for many problems associated with heart disease.

The research was done by Danielle Buck, a doctoral candidate in the UA’s Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology. She worked under the direction of Henk Granzier, a professor in cellular and molecular medicine and physiology, who has studied titin for years.

Previous studies had shown that alterations in titin are involved in muscular myopathies, but whether these deviations actually cause myopathies, or merely result from them, has remained a mystery.

Buck has shown that mutations in the titin gene do in fact cause myopathies in skeletal muscles. Her study, published today in the Journal of General Physiology, could be an important first step in developing treatments to address causes of the disease.

“Patients with muscle myopathy experience muscle weakness, but not a lot has been known about what is going wrong at the molecular and genetic level, except that titin is often involved,” Buck said. “Many patients with heart disease also have mutations in titin. So to develop treatments we need to understand the structure of titin and how it can cause or respond to disease.”

“With about 35,000 amino acids, titin is the largest protein known, roughly 100 times larger than typical proteins, which have only around several hundred amino acids,” Granzier explained. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins.

Titin, he said, functions as a molecular spring that makes tissues elastic so that when they deform they can snap back again. “Titin is a vital determinant of the elasticity of skeletal and heart muscles, which is very important for normal muscular function,” he noted.

“Titin is like the stretchy material in a rubber balloon,” said Buck. “If you have a balloon that is too stretchy or too stiff, then it’s not going to be able to expand or contract. Tissues also need to have elasticity so that they can restore their original shape after they have been contracted.”

Conducting genetic testing for mutations in the titin gene and studying the defects in the protein have been challenging due to titin’s “enormous size,” Granzier said. “But excellent facilities at the University of Arizona have enabled researchers to make great impact and progress has recently accelerated.”

Buck’s research “has directly shown that introducing specific changes to the titin gene can lead to disease in skeletal muscles,” Granzier said. “We know now that titin itself can trigger the disease. Danielle’s research shows that this giant protein needs to be tuned just right or it can cause myopathies to develop in skeletal muscles.”

Buck’s research “also demonstrated for the first time that changing a part of the gene results in a cascade of additional damaging changes in the protein,” he added.

“We found that in skeletal muscles, deleting one area of titin can affect expression of the entire protein and other areas can subsequently be deleted as well,” Buck said. “Shortening titin leads to a cascade of effects that cause titin to be even shorter, and that causes the muscle to become very stiff.”

Buck approached her work from many levels, Granzier said. “She worked at the gene level, the transcription level, the protein level and the functional level of cells and tissues to get an integrative understanding of the changes that this genetic modification caused.”

“We try to look at all these levels so that we can get a deeper understanding of the mechanisms that give rise to disease,” he added. “It is a multidisciplinary study, from molecular and cellular biology to integrative physiology.”

Understanding what factors cause myopathies could enable researchers to reverse the disease in humans by developing medications to counter damaging activity of the gene, Buck said.

“The next step ideally would be to use this model as an avenue to find new future therapeutic targets,” she said.

Buck already has begun to forge into research around a possible cure for myopathies.

Granzier’s lab, including John Smith and Charles Chung, collaborated with researchers at the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science in Japan and at the University of Heidelberg in Germany. The study was supported by National Institutes of Health grants to Granzier as well as fellowships from the Bellows Foundation and the ARCS Foundation to Buck.

This story and photos are online:
http://uanews.org/story/ua-researchers-find-culprit-behind-skeletal-muscle-disease

Research paper: http://jgp.rupress.org/content/143/2/215

Contacts

Sources
Henk Granzier
Professor, Molecular and Cellular Biology and Physiology
520-626-3641
granzier@email.arizona.edu
Danielle Buck
Doctoral candidate, Molecular and Cellular Biology
dbuck1@email.arizona.edu
UANews Contact
Shelley Littin
319-541-1482
littin@email.arizona.edu

Shelley Littin | UANews
Further information:
http://www.arizona.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Electrical 'switch' in brain's capillary network monitors activity and controls blood flow
27.03.2017 | Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont

nachricht Laser activated gold pyramids could deliver drugs, DNA into cells without harm
24.03.2017 | Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Northern oceans pumped CO2 into the atmosphere

27.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

Fingerprint' technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Big data approach to predict protein structure

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>