Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Type 1 diabetes in young children: soluble fiber intake has no preventive effect

21.07.2015

The search for a food component that protects against type 1 diabetes continues. Analyses conducted by the international TEDDY (The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young) study suggest that the intake of soluble dietary fiber has no protective effect on the immune system or the microbiome.

A low-fiber diet is considered to be a potential trigger for such diseases as colon cancer and irritable bowel syndrome arising from inflammatory processes or an autoimmune re-sponse. Scientists at the Institute of Diabetes Research and the Forschergruppe Diabetes e. V., examined whether, conversely, a fiber-rich diet – particularly one that has a high content of soluble fiber – could prevent the autoimmune disease type 1 diabetes.

To this end, they analyzed over 17,600 food records from more than 3,300 children from Germany and the United States who took part in the TEDDY study. The records were kept at regular intervals, when the children were between nine and 48 months of age.

The children’s islet autoantibody status was checked every three months. When one or multiple islet autoantibodies are detected in the blood, this is referred to as islet autoimmunity. If multiple islet autoantibodies are found, almost 100 percent of the individuals concerned will go on to develop type 1 diabetes within 20 years.

Can soluble fiber protect against islet autoimmunity?

When soluble fibers are digested in the gut, they undergo fermentation, which produces short-chain fatty acids, to which anti-inflammatory properties are ascribed. In addition, there are indications that fibers affect the composition of the intestinal flora. The micro-organisms that inhabit the bowel, meanwhile, interact with the immune system.

Current studies indicate that the microbiome of individuals with type 1 diabetes differs from that of healthy individuals. The diabetes researchers from Munich therefore assumed that a high intake of soluble fiber in the first two years of life could protect against the development of islet autoimmunity. Most cases of islet autoimmunity occur at this stage in life.

Unfortunately no evidence was found to support this assumption. At no stage in early childhood could a statistically significant connection be established between the amount of high-fiber food ingested and a later onset of islet autoimmunity or an earlier manifestation of type 1 diabetes.

“Our analyses lead us to conclude that an insufficient intake of fiber has no direct effect on inflammatory processes in the body that lead to type 1 diabetes,” says Dr. Andreas Beyerlein, a statistician at the Institute of Diabetes Research, summarizing the results.

“We are still a long way off from making dietary recommendations for preventing type 1 diabetes in high-risk individuals,” adds Dr. Beyerlein’s colleague, Dr. Sandra Hummel, who is a nutritional scientist. “It may be that other food components influence the microbiome and the development of autoimmunity.” Given the still relatively short follow-up time for participants in the TEDDY study (median follow-up = five years) long-term effects cannot, however, be ruled out.

The TEDDY Study is funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Publication:
Andreas Beyerlein, Xiang Liu, Ulla M Uusitalo, Minna Harsunen, Jill M Norris, Kristina Foterek, Suvi M Virtanen, Marian J Rewers, Jin-Xiong She, Olli Simell, Åke Lernmark, William Hagopian, Beena Akolkar, Anette-G Ziegler, Jeffrey P Krischer, Sandra Hummel, and the TEDDY study group. Dietary intake of soluble fiber and risk of islet autoimmunity by 5 y of age: results from the TEDDY study Am J Clin Nutr ajcn108159; First published online July 8, 2015. doi:10.3945/ajcn.115.108159

Claudia Pecher | Forschergruppe Diabetes der Technischen Universität München
Further information:
http://www.kompetenznetz-diabetes-mellitus.net

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Chronic stress induces fatal organ dysfunctions via a new neural circuit
21.08.2017 | Hokkaido University

nachricht New malaria analysis method reveals disease severity in minutes
14.08.2017 | University of British Columbia

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Nagoya physicists resolve long-standing mystery of structure-less transition

21.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

Chronic stress induces fatal organ dysfunctions via a new neural circuit

21.08.2017 | Health and Medicine

Scientists from the MSU studied new liquid-crystalline photochrom

21.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>