Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Telephone support after traffic accidents reduces problems and improves quality of life

People who were injured in road accidents had fewer problems and a much higher quality of life if they received a simple follow-up call from a nurse three weeks after being discharged from hospital, according to research in the January issue of the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

During the two-year study, researchers from Umea University in Sweden followed up 568 car occupants, cyclists and pedestrians who had attended the same emergency department after an accident.

They found that patients in the telephone support group were 35% less likely to complain of pain and discomfort than patients in the control group and that this rose to 40% when it came to car occupants. Patients who received support also reported fewer problems with anxiety, depression, everyday tasks and mobility.

The patients, who were between 18 and 70, were randomly assigned to the intervention group (288 people) or the control group (280). People with mental health problems or dementia were specifically excluded. 510 people completed the six-month study – 147 were car drivers, 178 were cyclists and 185 were pedestrians.

All the patients were asked to fill in the same quality of life questionnaire two weeks and six months after their accident.

Patients in the intervention group also received a follow-up call after three weeks. These ranged from an average of 12 minutes in the 38% of patients who didn’t need advice and 24 minutes in the 62% of patients who did ask for advice.

Key findings from the nurse-led phone calls included:

•Women were more than twice as likely to seek advice as men (69% versus 31%).

•Two-thirds of the problems mentioned by the intervention group were physical, such as pain and decreased mobility, and a third were psychological, such as emotional instability and feeling tense in traffic.

•Women were almost twice as likely to report physical problems as men (66% versus 34%) and almost four times as likely to report emotional problems (79% versus 21%).

•29% received advice on self care, 26% were advised to visit their local medical centre or hospital for further medical attention, 25% received advice on ongoing symptoms, 11% were advised to see a physiotherapist, 5% received advice on their prognosis and 4% received advice on medication like painkillers.

“The data collected two weeks and six months after the accidents showed that the intervention group had a significantly higher health-related quality of life than the control group” says lead author Carin Franzen from the Division of Surgery at the University.

“This was most noticeable in the patients who asked for, and received, advice during the follow-up phonecall from the nurse. When we looked at the different types of road users, we found that car occupants gained the greatest benefit from the phone call and reported fewer problems with pain, discomfort and usual activities than pedestrians and cyclists.”

Key findings from the six-month survey included:

•Patients in the intervention group reported fewer moderate or severe problems in four of the five quality of life categories looked at. 49% had mobility problems (59% in the control group), 17% reported anxiety or depression (26%), 14% had problems with usual activities (18%) and 9% had issues with mobility (12%). Self-care was the only issue where they had slightly more problems (4% in the intervention group and 2% in the control group).

•The most significant differences were in the car group. Pain and discomfort were reported by 38% in the support group, but 63% in the control group. Anxiety and depression were 20% and 32% in the support and control groups, usual activities were 12% and 25% and mobility was 6% and 13% respectively. Self-care was 1% in both groups.

“Our study clearly demonstrates that this simple scheme, which provided nurse-led support and advice for people involved in traffic accidents, was effective and led to reduced health problems and improved quality of life” says Carin Franzen.

Annette Whibley | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Inflammation Triggers Unsustainable Immune Response to Chronic Viral Infection
24.10.2016 | Universität Basel

nachricht Resolving the mystery of preeclampsia
21.10.2016 | Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

Im Focus: New Products - Highlights of COMPAMED 2016

COMPAMED has become the leading international marketplace for suppliers of medical manufacturing. The trade fair, which takes place every November and is co-located to MEDICA in Dusseldorf, has been steadily growing over the past years and shows that medical technology remains a rapidly growing market.

In 2016, the joint pavilion by the IVAM Microtechnology Network, the Product Market “High-tech for Medical Devices”, will be located in Hall 8a again and will...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Oasis of life in the ice-covered central Arctic

24.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

‘Farming’ bacteria to boost growth in the oceans

24.10.2016 | Life Sciences

Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

24.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

More VideoLinks >>>