Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New targets for treatment of diarrhoeal diseases discovered by RCSI researchers

29.11.2010
A study by researchers in the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) has uncovered a potential new target for the treatment of a range of intestinal diseases that are associated with diarrhoea. Current medications are often ineffective and can have serious side effects so this discovery gives hope for the development of new treatments for sufferers of intestinal disease.

Worldwide, almost 2 million children die each year as a result of infectious diarrhoea1, however, diarrhoeal diseases are also very common in developed countries. “Diarrhoea associated intestinal disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), Crohn’s disease, colitis, coeliac disease and microbial infections are a major health issue in Ireland.

It is estimated that between 40,000 and 50,000 people visit their local Gastroenterology clinic each year2 seeking treatment for diarrhoea. The cost to the Irish economy in terms of healthcare costs and lost working days is immense,” commented Dr Stephen Keely, senior author on the study and Associate Director of the RCSI Molecular Medicine Lab at Beaumont Hospital.

Explaining the findings of the research study, Dr Keely said: ‘Current treatments for intestinal diseases are not targeted specifically enough and as a result can be ineffective or have serious side effects. Working with researchers in UCD and TCD, we have discovered that a type of protein, known as hydroxylases, play a key role in regulating water and salt transport in the intestines. Our experimental results suggest that by inhibiting the activity of these proteins, diarrhoea can be prevented. The discovery gives us a promising new target for the development of drugs to treat intestinal diseases that have diarrhoea as a primary symptom. Because such drugs would act directly on the cells responsible for controlling water movement in the intestine, they would potentially have better outcomes and reduced side effects for patients,” Dr Keely concluded.

The lead author on the paper is Joseph Ward who conducted the research as part of his PhD studies along with Dr Karen Lawler and Dr Keely from the Molecular Medicine Laboratories in RCSI. The team also collaborated with Prof Padraic Fallon from the Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, and Prof Cormac Taylor of the Conway Institute at University College Dublin.

This work was published in the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) Journal in October 2010 and was funded by Science Foundation Ireland and the Higher Education Authority’s Programme for Research in Third Level Institutions (PRTLI) Cycle 4, as part of the National Biophotonics Imaging Platform (NBIP) Ireland.

Full bibliographic information
Ward J.B.J., Lawler K., Amu S., Taylor C.T., Fallon P.G., Keely S.J (2010). Hydroxylase inhibition attenuates colonic epithelial secretory function and ameliorates experimental diarrhea. FASEB Journal, October 2010

fj.10-166983 http://www.fasebj.org/content/early/2010/10/27/fj.10-166983.abstract

Jane Butler | alfa
Further information:
http://www.rcsi.ie

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections
17.02.2017 | University of California - San Diego

nachricht Tiny magnetic implant offers new drug delivery method
14.02.2017 | University of British Columbia

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Biocompatible 3-D tracking system has potential to improve robot-assisted surgery

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Real-time MRI analysis powered by supercomputers

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections

17.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>