Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Further support for later treatment of stroke

25.09.2008
A team of scientists at Karolinska Institutet recently showed that the time window for the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke (i.e. stroke caused by a blood clot) can be lengthened without putting the patient at risk.

New results published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine show that later treatment is also efficacious in that it improves the patients' prospects of recovery.

Thrombolytic treatment with the clot-busting drug alteplase is the only available method of treating acute stroke caused by a blood clot in the brain. However, the treatment is only approved within three hours after onset of stroke, which means that relatively few patients manage to be in a position to receive treatment before this time threshold has been crossed.

Scientists at the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet and the international network SITS (Safe Implementation of Treatments in Stroke) recently presented novel findings that may question present recommendations. The study, which was published in the Lancet on 15 September, demonstrated that thrombolysis administered within three to four and a half hours after a stroke was just as safe as that given within the three-hour time window.

These results are now corroborated by a study published in the top-ranking journal New England Journal of Medicine and co-authored by scientists from Karolinska Institutet. The study in question was a randomised comparative analysis of thrombolysis administered in the 3 to 4.5-hour interval and a placebo control, and shows that thrombolysis is more effective than control treatment and that many patients had recovered after three months.

"Both studies support the idea that the time window for thrombolysis should be extended, and this from the perspective of both safety and efficacy," says Professor Nils Wahlgren, who co-led both studies.

In this present study, 52.4 per cent of the patients who received thrombolysis recovered within three months, compared to 45.2 per cent of the placebo group - a statistically significant difference. A total of 418 patients received thrombolysis and 403 a placebo. The proportion of symptomatic haemorrhages was higher in the experimental group than in the control group, but no higher than in the currently approved 0 to 3-hour interval.

The results of the two studies are to be discussed at Karolinska Stroke Update, an international expert conference to be held from 16 to 18 November in Stockholm, at which a decision is due to be taken on whether the European guidelines should be changed.

Publication: 'Alteplase Compared with Placebo within 3 to 4.5 Hours for Acute Ischemic Stroke' Werner Hacke, Markku Kaste, Erich Bluhmki, Miroslav Brozman, Antoni Dávalos, Donata Guidetti, Vincent Larrue, Kennedy R Lees, Zakaria Medeghri, Thomas Machnig, Dietmar Schneider, Rüdiger von Kummer, Nils Wahlgren, and Danilo Toni, for the European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study (ECASS) investigators, New England Journal of Medicine, 25 September 2008

Earlier publication: 'Thrombolysis with alteplase 3-4.5 h after acute ischaemic stroke: an observational study', Nils Wahlgren, Niaz Ahmed, Antoni Dávalos, Werner Hacke, Mónica Millán, Keith Muir, Risto O Roine, Danilo Toni, Kennedy R Lees, for the SITS investigators, Lancet 16 September 2006

For further information, please contact:

Professor Nils Wahlgren
Department of Neuroscience
Tel: +46 (0)8-517 756 00 or +46 (0)70-484 14 99
E-mail: nils.wahlgren@karolinska.se
Katarina Sternudd, Press Officer
Tel: +46 (0)8-524 838 95 (forwarded to mobile)
Email: katarina.sternudd@ki.se

Katarina Sternudd | idw
Further information:
http://ki.se

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism
19.01.2018 | Weill Cornell Medicine

nachricht Researchers identify new way to unmask melanoma cells to the immune system
17.01.2018 | Duke University Medical Center

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Artificial agent designs quantum experiments

On the way to an intelligent laboratory, physicists from Innsbruck and Vienna present an artificial agent that autonomously designs quantum experiments. In initial experiments, the system has independently (re)discovered experimental techniques that are nowadays standard in modern quantum optical laboratories. This shows how machines could play a more creative role in research in the future.

We carry smartphones in our pockets, the streets are dotted with semi-autonomous cars, but in the research laboratory experiments are still being designed by...

Im Focus: Scientists decipher key principle behind reaction of metalloenzymes

So-called pre-distorted states accelerate photochemical reactions too

What enables electrons to be transferred swiftly, for example during photosynthesis? An interdisciplinary team of researchers has worked out the details of how...

Im Focus: The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics.

Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecules to interact. Life itself depends on this phenomenon: many biological processes involve...

Im Focus: Paradigm shift in Paris: Encouraging an holistic view of laser machining

At the JEC World Composite Show in Paris in March 2018, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be focusing on the latest trends and innovations in laser machining of composites. Among other things, researchers at the booth shared with the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Production (AZL) will demonstrate how lasers can be used for joining, structuring, cutting and drilling composite materials.

No other industry has attracted as much public attention to composite materials as the automotive industry, which along with the aerospace industry is a driver...

Im Focus: Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstrated the room-temperature magnetocapacitance effects of these GFO thin films.

Multiferroic materials show magnetically driven ferroelectricity. They are attracting increasing attention because of their fascinating properties such as...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

10th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Münster, 10-11 April 2018

08.01.2018 | Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Thanks for the memory: NIST takes a deep look at memristors

22.01.2018 | Materials Sciences

Radioactivity from oil and gas wastewater persists in Pennsylvania stream sediments

22.01.2018 | Earth Sciences

Saarland University bioinformaticians compute gene sequences inherited from each parent

22.01.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks Wissenschaft & Forschung
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>