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Sugar-free polyol gum, lozenges, hard candy; Nonfluoride varnishes help prevent cavities

13.09.2011
Recommended in conjunction with fluoride for patients at high-risk for developing cavities

A multi-disciplinary expert panel, convened by the American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs, issued a report this month containing clinical recommendations that sugar-free chewing gum, lozenges and hard candy including xylitol or polyol combinations, and a prescription varnish with chlorhexidine and thymol could be beneficial in preventing cavities when used as adjuncts to a comprehensive cavity prevention program which includes the use of fluoride-containing products.

The panel noted in its report that these nonfluoride options could provide an extra benefit to prevent cavities in patients at high risk for developing cavities when used in addition to products such as toothpaste, dental sealants and varnishes that contain fluoride as well as community water fluoridation and good eating habits.

The full report is available on the ADA's Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry (EBD) website (http://ebd.ada.org/contentdocs/clinical_recommendations_non_fluoride_

caries_preventive_agents_full_report.pdf) .

The executive summary of the report entitled, "Nonfluoride Caries Preventive Agents," is published in the September issue of The Journal for the American Dental Association and is available on the EBD website (http://jada.ada.org/content/142/9/1065.full.pdf ). The clinical recommendations from the expert panel were reviewed and approved by the ADA's Council on Scientific Affairs.

The ADA recommends that clinicians determine a patient's risk for developing cavities by conducting a caries risk assessment, which includes completing a caries risk assessment form that can be used as a communications tool with their patients. The Caries Form (Patients Ages 0 Years) (http://jada.ada.org/content/142/9/1065.full.pdf ) and the Caries Form (Patients Over 6 Years) (http://jada.ada.org/content/142/9/1065.full.pdf) are available on ADA.org.

Nonfluoride agents

In addition to a comprehensive cavity-prevention program which includes the use of fluoride, the scientific panel recommended that clinicians consider applying a mixture of cholrhexidine-thymol varnish to the teeth of high-risk adults and the elderly every three months to reduce cavities developing in the root of the tooth.

The panel encouraged clinicians to consider advising parents and caregivers of healthy children older than 5 years who are at higher risk for cavities to chew sugar-free polyol gum after meals for 10 to 20 minutes to prevent cavities.

A polyol is a low-calorie sweetener such as xylitol, sorbitol or mannitol, which is not broken down by the bacteria in the mouth and therefore does not contribute to tooth decay. The panel also recommended that sucking xylitol-containing sugar-free lozenges or hard candy after meals may reduce cavities in children.

The panel's recommendations are based on a review of evidence from 71 published articles that described 50 randomized controlled trials and 15 nonrandomized studies to assess the effectiveness of various nonfluoride agents in preventing cavities.

ADA expert panels, Evidence-Based Dentistry

The clinical recommendations, developed by expert multidisciplinary panels convened by the ADA Council on Scientific Affairs, assessed available scientific evidence and developed practice-oriented recommendations through a comprehensive evidence-based process.

Evidence-based clinical recommendations are intended to provide dentists and other health professionals with a review of the latest scientific evidence on particular topics and are not considered a standard of care. Rather, health care professionals can consider clinical recommendations, patient preference and their own clinical judgment when diagnosing and treating patients.

Evidence-based clinical recommendations are a product of the Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry (EBD). The ADA created the Center for EBD to connect the latest research findings with the daily practice of dentistry. The EBD website (http://jada.ada.org/content/142/9/1065.full.pdf ) provides on-demand access to systematic reviews, summaries and clinical recommendations (http://jada.ada.org/content/142/9/1065.full.pdf ) that translate the latest scholarly findings into a user-friendly format that dentists can use with their patients.

The ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry has a two-fold vision: to disseminate the most current scientific evidence and to help dentists implement the current best evidence in practice. The Center has several ongoing programs to help dentists implement EBD, including the EBD Champion Program and the ADA Evidence Reviewer Workshop. For more information, visit http://ebd.ada.org/.

About the American Dental Association

The not-for-profit ADA is the nation's largest dental association, representing more than 156,000 dentist members. The premier source of oral health information, the ADA has advocated for the public's health and promoted the art and science of dentistry since 1859. The ADA's state-of-the-art research facilities develop and test dental products and materials that have advanced the practice of dentistry and made the patient experience more positive. The ADA Seal of Acceptance long has been a valuable and respected guide to consumer dental care products. The monthly Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA) is the ADA's flagship publication and the best-read scientific journal in dentistry. For more information about the ADA, visit the Association's Web site at www.ada.org

Lydia Hall | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ada.org

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