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Salt-Reduced Food Can Get Taste Boost from Dried Fish Used in Japan

07.09.2009
Flavor is supreme and health conscious consumers that turn to lower sodium foods may have difficulty enjoying the healthier versions of their favorite foods. However, Japanese researchers suggest that dried bonito flakes made from fish may accentuate the salty taste of products, according to a study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists.

Low sodium diets are generally regarded as tasteless, and Japanese consumers find it difficult to reduce their salt intake. The World Health Organization has strongly recommended an average salt intake of less than 5g per day.

High sodium consumption is associated with increased blood pressure and risk of cardiovascular disease. In response to the high average daily salt intake in Japan, dried bonito is widely used in food preparation. Dried bonito is made through various processes such as boiling, smoke drying and inoculation with molds. Its taste and aroma are appealing to Japanese consumers.

Researchers from Doshisha Women’s College of Liberal Arts and the Ninben Co. Ltd., both in Japan, examined the effects of aroma and taste of dried bonito stock on salt enhancement and palatability of salt-reduced food. The study was conducted with people who sampled the taste and aroma of the stock prepared with two kinds of dried bonito: arabushi (mold-free) and karebushi (with mold). The taste testers determined the following:

• The characteristic aroma and taste of the karebushi stock effectively improved the palatability of food, regardless of the intensity of its saltiness.

• Karebushi stock effectively enhanced saltiness and improved overall palatability of salt-reduced food.

• The aroma of dried bonito did not enhance saltiness but prevented the loss of palatability of a low-salt diet.

• Karebushi combined with dried kelp could improve the taste of the stock without the addition of monosodium glutamate (MSG).

The researchers conclude that their results may be helpful in the development of new ways of preparing palatable salt-reduced foods by using the stock of Karebushi combined with dried kelp.

To receive a copy of the study, please contact Jeannie Houchins at jhouchins@ift.org.

About IFT
The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) exists to advance the science of food. Our long-range vision is to ensure a safe and abundant food supply contributing to healthier people everywhere. Founded in 1939, IFT is a nonprofit scientific society with 20,000 individual members working in food science, food technology, and related professions in industry, academia, and government. IFT champions the use of sound science across the food value chain through knowledge sharing, education, and advocacy, encouraging the exchange of information, providing both formal and informal educational opportunities, and furthering the advancement of the profession. IFT has offices in Chicago, Illinois, and Washington, D.C.

Jeannie Houchins | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://ift.org

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