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Robotic Repair for Vaginal Prolapse Has Significant Benefits

11.11.2009
New Mayo Clinic research has found that robotic surgery for vaginal prolapse dramatically reduces patient hospital stay and recovery time. These findings are being presented this week at the North Central Section of the American Urological Association in Scottsdale, Ariz.

Vaginal prolapse is a condition in which structures such as the uterus, rectum, bladder, urethra, small bowel, or the vagina itself may begin to prolapse, or fall, from their normal positions. Without treatment or surgery, these structures may eventually prolapse farther into the vagina or even through the vaginal opening if their supports weaken enough.

“Vaginal prolapse is a common, yet distressing physical and cosmetic condition that 10–15 percent of women will suffer in their lifetimes,” says Daniel Elliott, M.D., Mayo Clinic urologist and senior author on the study. “Robotic sacrocolpopexy surgery appears to offer many new benefits for patients — including decreased hospital stay and quicker recovery. Our study looked at longer-term results post-surgery to find out how patients fared.”

From 2002 to 2008, 48 women with symptomatic high-grade post-hysterectomy vaginal vault prolapse underwent robotic sacrocolpopexy, or vaginal wall repair. Researchers monitored these patients for three years to evaluate the success rate of the procedure. Overall, researchers found better outcomes for robotic sacrocolpopexy patients than traditional surgery, which included: 1) less-invasive, laparoscopic surgery took less time in the operating room; 2) fewer postoperative complications; 3) shorter hospital stay; and 4) faster postoperative recovery and return to work or normal activities.

“Traditional abdominal sacrocolpopexy is a very durable procedure, but recovery is long and sometimes dissuades women from having surgery,” says Dr. Elliott “This new robotic surgery is a major improvement and offers more options for women who want to have their prolapse repaired and are looking for a less-invasive type of procedure.”

Others on the Mayo research team include M.A. Childs, M.D., and George Chow, M.D. (http://www.mayoclinic.org/bio/11602074.html).

About Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic is the first and largest integrated, not-for-profit group practice in the world. Doctors from every medical specialty work together to care for patients, joined by common systems and a philosophy of "the needs of the patient come first." More than 3,300 physicians, scientists and researchers and 46,000 allied health staff work at Mayo Clinic, which has sites in Rochester, Minn., Jacksonville, Fla., and Scottsdale/Phoenix, Ariz. Collectively, the three locations treat more than half a million people each year. To obtain the latest news releases from Mayo Clinic, go to www.mayoclinic.org/news. For information about research and education, visit www.mayo.edu. MayoClinic.com (www.mayoclinic.com) is available as a resource for your health stories.

Amy Tieder | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mayo.edu

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