Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Resisting the flu

16.01.2014
New avenues for influenza control suggested by identification of an enzyme that plays a crucial role in resistance to the infection

McGill researchers, led by Dr. Maya Saleh of the Department of Medicine, have identified an enzyme, cIAP2 that helps the lungs protect themselves from the flu by giving them the ability to resist tissue damage.


Lung tissue from cIAP2-deficient mice showing effects on epithelial cells of influenza infection

Image credit: Claudia Champagne, McGill University

“It’s a discovery that offers exciting new avenues for controlling influenza, since until now attempts to target the virus itself have proven challenging, especially in the face of emerging new strains of the virus,” says Saleh, who is also a researcher at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC). “The results from our study now suggest that one effective way of countering influenza infections may instead be offered by enhancing the body’s resistance to the virus.”

Like many other battles, fighting the flu is a combination of both control and defence.

On the one hand, on the control end of the process, our immune system comes into play to prevent the virus from replicating inside our cells, and attacking with increasing strength. At the same time, on the defensive side, our bodies need to actively resist the destruction and harmful cell death that is caused by the virus.

By investigating the role played by cIAP2 in mice with the H1N1 influenza A virus, what Saleh and her team discovered was that the enzyme is necessary to control the nature of cell death during influenza infection. They found that cIAP2, which functions by modifying and activating survival factors in the cell, steers the body away from an inflammatory and auto-destructive process known as necrotic death. The enzyme is, in effect, a gatekeeper of cell death.

In its absence, the same factors that depend on cIAP2 to keep the cell alive, reveal a destructive side and induce a harmful form of cell death. cIAP2 therefore not only protects the infected cells from dying in such a manner, but also protects uninfected neighbouring cells in the same tissue. By doing so, this enzyme increases the resistance of the lung to influenza infection and associated pathology.

The researchers believe that the identification of this pathway of resistance to flu opens a number of avenues for future drug development. Ian Rodrigue-Gervais is a post-doctoral fellow in Prof. Saleh’s lab and one of the authors on the paper. According to him, what is truly exciting about this discovery is that it suggests that it may be possible to suppress features of flu-inflicted tissue injury. “What we saw in this study is that if the enzyme cIAP2 is present, the host can better tolerate the infection and then reduce the illness.”

This research was funded by the Canadian Institutes for Health Research the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, the Fonds de recherche en santé du Québec (FRSQ), the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG)/Abbott, the Strauss Foundation, the Kidney Cancer Association and the National Institutes of Health.

To read the full article, ‘Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein cIAP2 regulates pulmonary tissue necrosis and host survival to influenza A virus infection’ by Rodrigue-Gervais et al in Cell Host & Microbe: http://www.cell.com/cell-host-microbe/home


Researcher contacts for French and English interviews
Team leader: maya.saleh@mcgill.ca
Post-doctoral researcher: ian.rodrigue-gervais@mail.mcgill.ca
http://www.mcgill.ca/newsroom/
http://twitter.com/McGillU
Contact Information
Contact: Katherine Gombay
Organization: Media Relations Office
Email: katherine.gombay@mcgill.ca
Office Phone: 514-398-2189

Katherine Gombay | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mcgill.ca

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Real-time imaging of lung lesions during surgery helps localize tumors and improve precision
30.07.2015 | American Association for Thoracic Surgery

nachricht Experimental MERS vaccine shows promise in animal studies
29.07.2015 | NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Glaciers melt faster than ever

Glacier decline in the first decade of the 21st century has reached a historical record, since the onset of direct observations. Glacier melt is a global phenomenon and will continue even without further climate change. This is shown in the latest study by the World Glacier Monitoring Service under the lead of the University of Zurich, Switzerland.

The World Glacier Monitoring Service, domiciled at the University of Zurich, has compiled worldwide data on glacier changes for more than 120 years. Together...

Im Focus: Quantum Matter Stuck in Unrest

Using ultracold atoms trapped in light crystals, scientists from the MPQ, LMU, and the Weizmann Institute observe a novel state of matter that never thermalizes.

What happens if one mixes cold and hot water? After some initial dynamics, one is left with lukewarm water—the system has thermalized to a new thermal...

Im Focus: On the crest of the wave: Electronics on a time scale shorter than a cycle of light

Physicists from Regensburg and Marburg, Germany have succeeded in taking a slow-motion movie of speeding electrons in a solid driven by a strong light wave. In the process, they have unraveled a novel quantum phenomenon, which will be reported in the forthcoming edition of Nature.

The advent of ever faster electronics featuring clock rates up to the multiple-gigahertz range has revolutionized our day-to-day life. Researchers and...

Im Focus: Superfast fluorescence sets new speed record

Plasmonic device has speed and efficiency to serve optical computers

Researchers have developed an ultrafast light-emitting device that can flip on and off 90 billion times a second and could form the basis of optical computing.

Im Focus: Unlocking the rice immune system

Joint BioEnergy Institute study identifies bacterial protein that is key to protecting rice against bacterial blight

A bacterial signal that when recognized by rice plants enables the plants to resist a devastating blight disease has been identified by a multi-national team...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

3rd Euro Bio-inspired - International Conference and Exhibition on Bio-inspired Materials

23.07.2015 | Event News

Clash of Realities – International Conference on the Art, Technology and Theory of Digital Games

10.07.2015 | Event News

World Conference on Regenerative Medicine in Leipzig: Last chance to submit abstracts until 2 July

25.06.2015 | Event News

 
Latest News

“Seeing” molecular interactions could give boost to organic electronics

03.08.2015 | Materials Sciences

Stroke: news about platelets

03.08.2015 | Life Sciences

Molecular Spies to Fight Cancer - Procedure for improving tumor diagnosis successfully tested

03.08.2015 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>