Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers identify gene linked with early epilepsy

11.03.2015

Treatment may help prevent poor brain development in some cases

Certain types of early-onset epilepsy are caused by previously unknown mutations of a potassium channel gene, KCNA2. The mutations disrupt the electrical balance in the brain in two ways. In some patients, the flow of potassium is greatly reduced; while in others, it is raised enormously.

Both states can lead to hard-to-treat epileptic seizures. Mental and motor development can come to a stop, or even to regress. These findings were made by a group of European scientists led by researchers at the Universities of Leipzig and Tübingen. Their results are published in the latest Nature Genetics.

Among the things the brain needs in order to function is the interaction of many different ion channels, which regulate electrical signals by keeping a delicate balance between the influences which make cells rest or become excited. The ion channels are located in the cell wall of a neuron, together with many other pores and channels.

“The potassium channel KCNA2 is one of many channels. It regulates the flow of potassium ions by opening and shutting, thereby also regulating the electrical excitability of the neurons in the brain,” explains Professor Johannes Lemke, head of Leipzig University Hospitals’ Institute of Human Genetics. Mutations in various ion channels are one of the main causes of epilepsy.

“That is why identifying each mutation in the ion channel is important for diagnosing the individual epilepsy syndrome and finding ways of treating it,” says Professor Holger Lerche, of Tübingen’s Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research (HIH) and medical director of Neurology and Epileptology at the Tübingen University Hospitals.

The researchers discovered that the mutations disrupt the ion channel’s function either by cutting the flow of potassium, leading to a loss of function; or by increasing potassium flow, leading to an excess gain of function. Patients demonstrating a loss of function had their first epileptic seizures starting at the age of around one, but the attacks ceased during childhood or in the patient’s teenage years.

For patients with increased function, however, epileptic seizures began even earlier and recurred into adulthood. The degree of mental disability and related problems was greater in the latter group. The types of early-childhood-onset epilepsy caused by potassium ion channel mutations comprise a field of study all their own within epileptic encephalopathy, the severe epilepsies which start early in life and which are linked with various degrees of developmental disruptions, reduced intelligence and other neuropsychiatric symptoms such as autism and disruptions to voluntary muscle coordination (ataxia).

For patients whose potassium flows are too high, there is an immediate treatment option in the form of 4-aminopyridine, an approved drug which specifically blocks the relevant ion channel. This treatment is to be applied. The researchers and doctors hope it will lead to a reduction of seizures and improve mental abilities. However, it is not expected that the treatment can correct severe mental retardation due to faulty neural networks or deformed neurons caused during the development of the brain.

For this reason, it is important to identify the genetic defects as early as possible in the brain - so as to prevent developmental retardation as far as possible. As to the patients with a loss of function in their potassium flows, the researchers aim to conduct further experiments into exactly how the epileptic seizures arise - so as to find new ways of treating the disorder. Then they would be able to improve the lot of a small proportion of patients with epileptic ecephalopathy with improved and individualized therapies.

Publication
De novo loss- or gain-of-function mutations in KCNA2 cause epileptic encephalopathy), Nature Genetics (2015) doi:10.1038/ng.3239; Published online 09 March 2015; http://www.nature.com/ng/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ng.3239.html

Silke Jakobi | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft
Further information:
http://www.hih-tuebingen.de

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties
23.02.2017 | Vanderbilt University

nachricht Researchers identify cause of hereditary skeletal muscle disorder
22.02.2017 | Klinikum der Universität München

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>