Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers find hormone that predicts premature death in kidney patients

09.09.2011
Discovery will allow earlier interventions

Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine have found that high levels of a specific hormone can predict which kidney patients will develop heart problems, require dialysis or die prematurely.

"This discovery allows us to predict at-risk patients before they require dialysis," said lead investigator Michel Chonchol, MD, an associate professor of medicine specializing in nephrology. "That's critical because approximately 23 percent of patients on dialysis die in the first year."

The findings were published Friday in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Chonchol and fellow CU School of Medicine researcher Jessica Kendrick, MD, studied the blood plasma of patients with advanced kidney disease and found that levels of fibroblast growth factor-23, a hormone known as FGF-23, increased as the patient's kidney function decreased.

The hormone regulates phosphorous levels in the body. As the kidneys fail, they are unable to excrete phosphorous which raises FGF-23 levels. The higher the hormone levels, the greater chance the patient will die.

"At this point we don't know how the hormone changes the body," Chonchol said.

By the time a patient is down to just 30 or 40 percent kidney function, the levels of FGF-23 can predict who will die, have a cardiac event or end up on dialysis. Almost 50 percent of the deaths result from cardiovascular issues like heart attack.

Until now, doctors relied on measuring phosphorous to assess phosphate balance in patients with kidney disease.

"Prior to a patient going on dialysis the phosphorous levels shoot up," Chonchol said.

But he found that long before phosphorous levels jump, FGF-23 levels have already increased. Identifying this earlier will allow doctors to intervene with drugs that can lower phosphorous which would then lower the hormone level.

"This has provided us a critical marker to look for," Chonchol said, "A marker that could save lives."

Kidney disease currently afflicts 20 million Americans and is a growing problem as the nation gets increasingly obese and diabetes continues to rise.

"The best ways to prevent kidney disease is through blood pressure control, diet, exercise and maintaining a healthy body weight," Chonchol said.

Faculty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine work to advance science and improve care. These faculty members include physicians, educators and scientists at University of Colorado Hospital, Children's Hospital Colorado, Denver Health, National Jewish Health, and the Denver Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Degrees offered by the CU Denver School of Medicine include doctor of medicine, doctor of physical therapy, and masters of physician assistant studies. The School is located on the University of Colorado's Anschutz Medical Campus, one of four campuses in the University of Colorado system. For additional news and information, please visit CU Denver newsroom online.

David Kelly | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ucdenver.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis
23.01.2017 | Massachusetts General Hospital

nachricht Team discovers how bacteria exploit a chink in the body's armor
20.01.2017 | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Arctic melt ponds form when meltwater clogs ice pores

24.01.2017 | Earth Sciences

Synthetic nanoparticles achieve the complexity of protein molecules

24.01.2017 | Life Sciences

PPPL physicist uncovers clues to mechanism behind magnetic reconnection

24.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>