Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New report describes 7 essential steps toward an AIDS-free generation

20.07.2012
Internationally respected frontline public health experts ask: Will society pay the price to turn a dream into reality?

The end of AIDS is within our reach. But as the authors of a new special supplement in the August, 2012 Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiencies (JAIDS) point out, new financial investments – and renewed commitments – from countries around the world will be critical to fully implement proven treatment and prevention tools already at hand and to continue essential scientific research.

"Only then will an AIDS-free generation be possible," write the supplement's editors -- Richard Marlink, Wafaa El-Sadr, Mariangela Simao and Elly Katabira – in their introduction. **

"Are we willing to pay the price to turn the dream into a reality?" they ask.

Dr., Marlink, Executive Director of the Harvard School of Public Health AIDS Initiative, is available for media interviews on the recommendations in the special supplement, which are the outgrowth of an international conference on AIDS convened at Harvard School of Public Health in December, 2011. The conference brought together more than 200 global experts in the field from academia, government, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector in anticipation of the upcoming International AIDS Conference in Washington D.C. being held July 22-27, 2012.

The supplement may be reviewed online at http://journals.lww.com/jaids/toc/2012/08012 .

Entitled "Engaging to End the Epidemic: Seven Essential Steps Toward an AIDS-Free Generation," the supplement identifies the seven key areas where money and political will must be focused to end AIDS. These include:
The promise and challenges of using antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to prevent HIV transmission

New AIDS treatments, improving the ARV pipeline to treat those infected, and working toward a cure

Enhancing the role of government leaders, the private sector, and non-governmental organizations (NGOS) in driving local and national responses to the epidemic

Narrowing health disparities in preventing and treating AIDS caused by economic disempowerment, discrimination, and stigma

Preventing AIDS transmission from mothers to babies in low- and middle-income countries where access to prevention services are most limited, but where new drug interventions show AIDS could be virtually eliminated in infants and children

Funding the pursuit for AIDS vaccines, which are necessary to actually eliminate the disease

Maximizing and growing current investments in the global AIDS response, rather than decreasing funding. In addition to its humanitarian impact, money spent going forward is a good global and local investment because improving and sustaining people's health enables them to be productive members of society contributing to the growth of their nations' economies.

Each article provides a unique assessment of progress and a specific plan for moving forward. Dr. Marlink is available for interviews to discuss these assessments and plans. Interviews with other contributors to the supplement can also be arranged.

**Richard Marlink: Harvard School of Public Health, and Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation; Wafaa El-Sadr, Mailman School of Public Health and College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment (ICAP) and Harlem Hospital Center; Mariangela Simao, Rights, Gender and Community Mobilization Department, UNAIDS Secretariat; Elly Katabira, International AIDS Society, and Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Kampala Uganda

Todd Datz | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.harvard.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Biofilm discovery suggests new way to prevent dangerous infections
23.05.2017 | University of Texas at Austin

nachricht Another reason to exercise: Burning bone fat -- a key to better bone health
19.05.2017 | University of North Carolina Health Care

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

How herpesviruses win the footrace against the immune system

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Water forms 'spine of hydration' around DNA, group finds

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

First Juno science results supported by University of Leicester's Jupiter 'forecast'

26.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>