Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

For the first time, UAB researchers have cured mice with diabetes type 1

10.05.2002


A team of researchers from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) has cured mice with diabetes type 1 for the first time. In the experiment, the diabetic mice completely recovered from the disease after having suffered excesses of glucose in their blood. Although the mice used were transgenic, the researchers are sure that there will soon be a genic therapy based on this discovery that will cure non-transgenic mice with diabetes type 1, and which, within a few years, will also be able to cure people. The study was published in last edition of Journal of Clinical Investigation.



A research team led by Fatima Bosch, professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the UAB, has studied the effects of protein IGF-I on mice with diabetes type 1, i.e. the type of diabetes produced by a decrease in the number of beta cells in the pancreas, the ones which produce insulin. In order to study this effect, the researchers used mice that were genetically modified so that the beta cells in their pancreases would produce protein IGF-I, and have compared the development of diabetes type 1 in this type of mice to the evolution of the disease in control mice (without genetic modifications).

The results of the experiments clearly show that in the transgenic mice with the gene that codifies for protein IGF-I activated in beta cells, the induction of experimental diabetes leads to the replication of these cells, their programmed cellular death is counteracted (apoptosis) and the resident mother cells in the conducts of the pancreas are induced to develop insulin-producing beta cells. All these effects lead to the mice completely recovering from the disease, re-establishing absolutely normal levels of glucose in their blood.


The team of UAB scientists chose to experiment with this protein because it has provided excellent results in vitro – it causes the replication of beta cells and counteracts apoptosis – and moreover, mice in which there is destruction of the gene that codifies the IGF-I receptor have very small pancreatic islets (the conglomerates of the beta cells in the pancreas).

This is the first time in which it has been demonstrated that a curative therapy for diabetes is possible, and could imply important advantages over other therapies that are currently being investigated, such as the transplant of islets or beta cells cultivated in vitro. Moreover, in the therapy developed by Doctor Fatima Bosch’s team, the effect of IGF-I does not occur until the animal suffers the destruction of its beta cells. Therefore, non-diabetic transgenic animals are perfectly normal, without any alterations or secondary effects.

The researchers are sure that the next stage of the research programme, the curing of normal (i.e. non-transgenic) mice with diabetes 1 by mean of genic therapy, will probably take place in the near future. Once the scientists have successfully carried out tests with experimental animals, they will be able to consider applying the technique to humans, although this will not be for some time. In order to cure diabetes type 1, viral vectors (innocuous viruses) carrying the gene that codifies for IGF-I will have to be injected into the pancreas.

The research, published in last edition of Journal of Clinical Investigation, has involved the participation of researchers from the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the UAB, specifically the Unit from this department based in the Faculty of Veterinary Science, along with members of the Centre for Animal Biotechnology and Genetic Therapy (CBATEG) at the Biocampus research complex of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. The research was financed by the Fondo de Investigación Sanitaria (Health Research Fund), the Plan Nacional de I+D (National R&D Plan) of the Spanish Ministry for Education and Culture, the TV3 Marató Foundation, the Generalitat de Catalunya’s General Research Management and the European Community Training and Mobility Program.

Octavi López Coronado | alphagalileo
Further information:
http://www.uab.es

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Researchers release the brakes on the immune system
18.10.2017 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

nachricht Norovirus evades immune system by hiding out in rare gut cells
12.10.2017 | University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

20.10.2017 | Information Technology

Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>