Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New drug shows promise for treating kidney cancer

30.10.2007
The new drug axitinib has shown promising activity in patients with cytokine-refractory, metastatic kidney cancer that traditionally have a poor response to drug treatment, according to an Article in the November issue of The Lancet Oncology.

In the USA, kidney cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer deaths, and is thought to be responsible for nearly 13 000 deaths a year. Kidney cancer is not a single disease, but is made up of several different types of cancer, each of which has different histological features, has a different clinical course, and responds differently to treatment.

The most common type is clear-cell renal cancer, which accounts for 75% of patients. Treatment options are limited and survival is poor, and responses with use of chemotherapy, hormonal, or biological treatment, and even with some of the new targeted drugs, seldom exceed 10%.

Professor Olivier Rixe (University of Paris, France) and colleagues report findings from a phase II trial of axitinib-a selective inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors 1, 2, and 3-in 52 patients with cytokine-refractory, metastatic kidney cancer (51 of whom had clear-cell renal cancer). 23 patients had complete or partial responses, some of which were long-lasting: 12 of these patients progressed during the study, with a duration of response ranging from around 4 months to 26 months. Additionally, 22 patients showed stable disease for longer than 8 weeks, including 13 patients with stable disease for 24 weeks or longer. Four patients had early disease progression. 30 patients had hypertension related to the treatment, but side-effects in general were manageable and controlled by dose modification or supportive care.

Selectively targeting a single growth factor receptor pathway could provide the potential to rationally adjust dosages and combine drugs directed at specific parts of the pathway to minimise toxicity and achieve the optimum therapeutic benefit. Professor Rixe concludes that “The objective response and time to progression in our study suggest that axitinib might be a promising drug in the treatment of patients with metastatic renal-cell cancer; although a randomised controlled trial is needed to confirm this finding.”

In an accompanying Reflection and Reaction comment, Dr W Marston Linehan (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MA, USA) states that these findings “suggest that a drug such as axitinib has promise as a second-line treatment in cytokine-refractory metastatic renal-cell carcinoma, and might have potential as first-line treatment or in combination with other agents targeting the Von Hippel-Lindau pathway (or both).”

Tony Kirby | alfa
Further information:
http://www.thelancet.com

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Biofilm discovery suggests new way to prevent dangerous infections
23.05.2017 | University of Texas at Austin

nachricht Another reason to exercise: Burning bone fat -- a key to better bone health
19.05.2017 | University of North Carolina Health Care

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object

23.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized

23.05.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>