Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Infrared imaging for sleep apnea diagnosis shows promise

24.10.2007
Remote heat imaging identifies sleep disorder without disturbing patients

Sleep apnea is commonly diagnosed by way of measuring airflow by nasal pressure, temperature, and/or carbon dioxide, through sensors placed in the nose. However, this method is uncomfortable to some and can potentially disturb sleep. But new research, presented at CHEST 2007, the 73rd annual international scientific assembly of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), shows that remote infrared imaging can monitor airflow and accurately detect abnormalities during sleep, without ever coming in contact with the patient. The study indicates that the new method is ideal because it is portable and can monitor sleep in a natural environment.

“Polysomnography is a diagnostic test, which establishes the presence or absence of sleep disorders. But standard methods have the potential to significantly disturb a patient’s sleep pattern, so what we see in the lab may not be a true representation of the patient’s sleep habits,” said lead study author Jayasimha Murthy, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, TX. “However, remote infrared imaging is a noncontact method, so there is minimal interference with the patient. In fact, this system can be designed to where the patient isn’t even aware that monitoring is taking place.”

In the first study of its kind, Dr. Murthy and his colleagues from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, the University of Houston, and Memorial Hermann Sleep Disorders Center in Houston, TX, evaluated the efficacy of remote infrared imaging (IR-I) in 13 men and women without known sleep apnea. Researchers recorded the heat signals expired from patients’ nostrils or mouth using an infrared camera during 1 hour of polysomnography. To minimize any bias, airflow channels were recorded and analyzed separately. Results were then compared with those obtained through the conventional methods of sleep apnea diagnosis, including nasal pressure, nasal-oral thermistors, and capnography.

“The underlying principle of monitoring the relative changes in airflow based on the changing of the infrared heat signal is similar to that of the traditional thermistor,” Dr. Murthy explained. “However, the biggest difference is that the thermistor is placed in the subject’s nostril while the infrared camera is placed 6 to 8 feet from the patient’s head. Also, this method allows us to have recorded data, so we can go back and extract the airflow data after the completion of the study, which we can’t do with conventional sensors.”

Upon completion, results showed that IR-I detected 20 sleep-disordered breathing events, compared with 22 events detected by the nasal-oral thermistor, and 19 events detected by nasal pressure. Given the outcome, researchers suggest that IR-I was in near-perfect agreement with conventional methods and that it represents a noncontact alternative to standard nasal-oral thermistors. Though Dr. Murthy acknowledges that this study represents a preliminary stage of testing, he is optimistic about the future of infrared imaging for sleep disorder diagnosis.

“The results from this study will greatly impact the development of this technology,” he said. “While implementation of this technology for clinical studies is still far away, these early results are encouraging enough for us to pursue this further.”

“Sleep apnea is a debilitating condition that affects millions of Americans and can lead to other, life-threatening illnesses,” said Alvin V. Thomas, Jr., MD, FCCP, President of the American College of Chest Physicians. “It is important for physicians and researchers to continue to explore new diagnostic tools in order to detect and treat this sleep disorder at the earliest possible stage.”

Deana Busche | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.chestnet.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht 'Living bandages': NUST MISIS scientists develop biocompatible anti-burn nanofibers
16.02.2018 | National University of Science and Technology MISIS

nachricht New process allows tailor-made malaria research
16.02.2018 | Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Japanese researchers develop ultrathin, highly elastic skin display

19.02.2018 | Information Technology

Dispersal of Fish Eggs by Water Birds – Just a Myth?

19.02.2018 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Studying mitosis' structure to understand the inside of cancer cells

19.02.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>