Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

ICT and telemedicine help out health care

16.04.2002


Waiting lists will not be eliminated by makeshift measures like a policy on absenteeism or recruiting people returning to work after having a family. The best way to balance supply and demand in the health care services is the application of ICT (Information and Communication Technology) and in particular telemedicine. These are care innovations of the future for which government will also have to open their pockets. This was the political message brought by prof.ir. Theo de Vries in his inaugural lecture as special professor Future Studies Health Care at the University of Twente, the Netherlands.



"ICT and telemedicine are necessary to keep supply in health care at a qualitatively acceptable level" De Vries argued in his lecture. They encourage steering by demand. It is highly probable that quality-improvement in care will then follow. The future application of ICT in health care will only yield the expected benefits if two conditions are met. The first concerns an infrastructure that communicates sufficiently with the decentralised steering of health care. In this it is the government, according to De Vries, that has to take its responsibility and generate initiatives. After all it has to do with indicating and realising the preconditions. The second condition relates to (private) players in care. They are the ones who have to produce concrete applications of care innovations on the basis of this infrastructure. Government should adopt an encouraging attitude, especially with regard to making budgets more flexible. This UT-professor sees in this a decisive role for transparency and knowledge transfer. Independent research into the effects of telemedicine in relation to the cost he deems essential.
The research is crucially important because the investments in ICT will increase by leaps and bounds. According to De Vries the European market (OECD) will double in size (30 billion Euro). The Dutch Institute for Telemedicine (NITEL) will play a key-role in researching the effects of telemedicine. One of the spearheads for the institute is Medical Technology Assessment for ICT-products. Together with stakeholders an independent board is being set up to judge the feasibility of ICT-initiatives in care independently.

Care consumer


Society has to give due consideration to the fact that the care consumer is increasingly demanding. "He or she will make choices and express his or her own wishes more and more. The traditional care system will have to respond to that. If they do not do that individual suppliers, like private clinics, care institutes and health care services offered on-line will be increasingly attractive and gain ground. Traditional health care could then find itself in a downward spiral."
The enormous amount of information and services on offer on the internet makes it increasingly difficult of care consumers to find their way to sites they can trust. Portals are one solution, but will turn out to be insufficient, De Vries warns. It is better to design intelligent search engines that take the educational background and characteristics of the care consumer into account when searching for information.
Moreover, many ICT-projects in health care cause friction, because the ICT-suppliers do not understand enough of the language and interests of the carers. The feasibility of the projects is often severely disrupted because of that. "It is of the utmost importance that we should be aware of this, on all levels", according to De Vries.

Bernadette Koopmans | alphagalileo
Further information:
http://www.utwente.nl/nieuws/pers/nieuw/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism
19.01.2018 | Weill Cornell Medicine

nachricht Researchers identify new way to unmask melanoma cells to the immune system
17.01.2018 | Duke University Medical Center

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Artificial agent designs quantum experiments

On the way to an intelligent laboratory, physicists from Innsbruck and Vienna present an artificial agent that autonomously designs quantum experiments. In initial experiments, the system has independently (re)discovered experimental techniques that are nowadays standard in modern quantum optical laboratories. This shows how machines could play a more creative role in research in the future.

We carry smartphones in our pockets, the streets are dotted with semi-autonomous cars, but in the research laboratory experiments are still being designed by...

Im Focus: Scientists decipher key principle behind reaction of metalloenzymes

So-called pre-distorted states accelerate photochemical reactions too

What enables electrons to be transferred swiftly, for example during photosynthesis? An interdisciplinary team of researchers has worked out the details of how...

Im Focus: The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics.

Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecules to interact. Life itself depends on this phenomenon: many biological processes involve...

Im Focus: Paradigm shift in Paris: Encouraging an holistic view of laser machining

At the JEC World Composite Show in Paris in March 2018, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be focusing on the latest trends and innovations in laser machining of composites. Among other things, researchers at the booth shared with the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Production (AZL) will demonstrate how lasers can be used for joining, structuring, cutting and drilling composite materials.

No other industry has attracted as much public attention to composite materials as the automotive industry, which along with the aerospace industry is a driver...

Im Focus: Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstrated the room-temperature magnetocapacitance effects of these GFO thin films.

Multiferroic materials show magnetically driven ferroelectricity. They are attracting increasing attention because of their fascinating properties such as...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

10th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Münster, 10-11 April 2018

08.01.2018 | Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Let the good tubes roll

19.01.2018 | Materials Sciences

How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism

19.01.2018 | Health and Medicine

Meteoritic stardust unlocks timing of supernova dust formation

19.01.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>