Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Long Term Antiretroviral Therapy Could Restore Normal CD4 Cell Counts In HIV Positive Patients

19.07.2007
HIV positive patients who take combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to combat HIV infection could see the numbers of CD4 cells in their immune system rise to concentrations found in HIV negative individuals, if they remain on the therapy for long enough and their HIV viral load load is suppressed to below 50 copies per ml. The findings are reported in an Article published early Online and in an upcoming edition of the Lancet.

However an accompanying Comment cautions the findings are only applicable to patients having periods of maximum virological suppression, and thus have limited application in low income countries.

Dr Amanda Mocroft, Royal Free Centre for HIV Medicine, Royal Free and University College London Medical Schools, and colleagues did a study of 1835 antiretroviral-naive patients from EuroSIDA, a pan-European observational cohort study. These patients, with a mean CD4 cell count of 204 cells per microlitre of blood, then started cART. They were selected because they all responded well to cART and their HIV viral loads were suppressed to below 50 copies per ml for extended periods of time.

The researchers found that the greatest average yearly increase in CD4 count of 100 cells per microlitre was seen in the year immediately following the start of cART. Significant, but lower, yearly increases of around 50 cells per microlitre were seen even five years after beginning cART in some cases, in which patients whose current CD4 count was below 500 cells per microlitre. Patients starting cART with low CD4 cell counts (of less than 200 cells per microlitre) had substantial rises in CD4 counts even after five years. The only groups without substantial increases in CD4 count were those where cART had been taken for more than five years with a current CD4 count of more than 500 cells per microlitre.

The authors conclude: “Normalisation of CD4 counts in HIV-infected patients for all infected individuals might be achievable if viral suppression with cART can be maintained for a sufficiently long period of time.

“We have shown that most patients with HIV who can maintain viral load at less than 50 copies per ml continue to have significant rises in CD4 counts, even after protracted exposure to combination therapy.

“Patients who started cART with a CD4 cell count of more than 350 cells per microlitre had CD4 cells counts approaching the level seen in HIV-negative individuals after more than three years of cART and had no further significant rises in CD4 counts.”

In the accompanying Comment, Dr Gary Maartens and Dr Andrew Boulle, University of Cape Town, South Africa, point out that CD4 cell count when patients start cART is the most important factor is predicting survival – not count increases after cART has begun.

They say: “Mocroft and colleagues’ findings that CD4 counts continue to increase on cART until normal values are reached, even with low CD4 counts at baseline, is only generalisable to patients on cART during periods of maximum virological suppression.”

They conclude: “Nevertheless, the researchers have shown that at least for patients with ideal responses to cART, normalisation of CD4 counts is likely to be achievable across a range of baseline counts.”

Tony Kirby | alfa
Further information:
http://www.thelancet.com

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht New 3-D imaging reveals how human cell nucleus organizes DNA and chromatin of its genome
28.07.2017 | University of California - San Diego

nachricht Malaria Already Endemic in the Mediterranean by the Roman Period
27.07.2017 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Abrupt motion sharpens x-ray pulses

Spectrally narrow x-ray pulses may be “sharpened” by purely mechanical means. This sounds surprisingly, but a team of theoretical and experimental physicists developed and realized such a method. It is based on fast motions, precisely synchronized with the pulses, of a target interacting with the x-ray light. Thereby, photons are redistributed within the x-ray pulse to the desired spectral region.

A team of theoretical physicists from the MPI for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg has developed a novel method to intensify the spectrally broad x-ray...

Im Focus: Physicists Design Ultrafocused Pulses

Physicists working with researcher Oriol Romero-Isart devised a new simple scheme to theoretically generate arbitrarily short and focused electromagnetic fields. This new tool could be used for precise sensing and in microscopy.

Microwaves, heat radiation, light and X-radiation are examples for electromagnetic waves. Many applications require to focus the electromagnetic fields to...

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New 3-D imaging reveals how human cell nucleus organizes DNA and chromatin of its genome

28.07.2017 | Health and Medicine

Heavy metals in water meet their match

28.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Oestrogen regulates pathological changes of bones via bone lining cells

28.07.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>