Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

EUREKA project introduces innovative furniture design for seniors

12.07.2007
While younger people can easily get in and out of bed or sit on a couch, older people can have a much harder time of it, with conditions such as arthritis or rheumatism considerably limiting their movements. Czech and German partners, involved in the EUREKA E! 3210 SPECIFURN project, have developed a new line of furniture aimed at making life and leisure easier for the elderly and infirm. Their designs are suitable for use in old people's homes, public urban spaces, swimming pools and railway stations.

“There is a lot to consider when designing furniture for senior citizens,” says SPECIFURN coordinator Josef Bartak of Form, in the Czech Republic. “We need to closely consider elderly people’s special needs, particularly their reduced mobility, but also other differences compared to younger members of the population.” The new designs were based on in-depth research and considerable accumulated experience among the partners.

Form, along with partners Addesign Furniture, also from the Czech Republic, and Germany’s Fidura Capital Consult, aimed to design a complete set of furniture, including wardrobe and other storage furniture, chairs and couches of varying comfort levels, bedroom furniture, a table and kitchen furniture. Chairs fell into three categories, including standard chairs and semi-armchairs, chairs with changeable positions, and armchairs with extensive features. Special features include better availability and visibility of stored items, rubberised or elastic handholds on lower furniture and wardrobes, insuring maximum safety when moving as well as passive protection against possible falls. New designs include removable upholstery for easy cleaning, suitable shaping of arm handles, and innovative mechanisms for changing furniture configuration.

An expanding market
By all accounts, populations in developed Central and Western European countries are growing older, says Bartak, due to decreasing birth rates and increasing life spans. This, he explains, can only increase the demand for specialised products and services for the elderly. Moreover, governments in all European countries are now continuously increasing spending on facilities for the aged. “We see our new designs giving rise to an even wider range of original and attractive wood-based furniture,” says Bartak, “furniture that is fully compliant with both ergonomic and ecological requirements and resistant to heavy use.”

“A firm of our size could not have afforded such an extensive programme of research and development without the help of EUREKA,” says Bartak. “We have achieved some remarkable results thanks to the important support we received.” Bartak says the new SPECIFURN designs have already been well received, making a big impact at MOBITEX 2007, a major trade fair that took place this year in Brno, in the Czech Republic. “The new furniture is unique in terms of its coherent approach to a complex series of problems associated with the aged.”

Sally Horspool | alfa
Further information:
http://www.eureka.be/specifurn

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht World first: Massive thrombosis removed during early pregnancy
20.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht Therapy of preterm birth in sight?
19.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>