Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

World-leading innovation in child-allergy detection

16.05.2007
In the past decade, food allergies have become a major point of concern for paediatricians, especially those treating very young children. The number of cases has almost doubled over the last ten years. EUREKA project E! 3292 MULTI-PATCH has helped to develop a full range of ‘DIALLERTEST’ products, aimed at detecting the most frequently observed children’s allergies, including milk, corn, soy and house dust mites. Already being marketed internationally, the results represent a major success for European medical research and development.

The scientific approach to allergies has evolved explains Pierre-Henri Benhamou of France’s DBV technologies. Aside from the well-known ‘immediate’ forms of allergy, which involve rapid acute symptoms upon allergen ingestion, ‘delayed’ types have also been described since the 1990s. Here, clinical symptoms, usually digestive or cutaneous reactions, occur several hours, days or even weeks after. “These allergies are caused by foods that form the base of the day-to-day diet,” says Benhamou, “and to which the patient becomes only gradually sensitised. Unlike the more traditional forms of allergy, the delayed forms pose important problems in terms of diagnosis.”

“What’s different about the ‘DIALLERTEST’ system is that it uses DBV’s new E-patch technology,” explains Benhamou. “This allows us to set dry powdered milk onto the patch by means of electrostatic forces. Thus, no additive or wet substance is needed to hold the suspected allergen in place. This represents an important simplification of the patch test.” It means that a much tighter control over the quantity of allergen is delivered, a more measurable and reproducible reaction, and, ultimately, more reliable and standardised screening for cow’s milk protein allergy. It will also allow doctors to keep allergens in their best reactive state, the powdered form. The materials used in ‘DIALLERTEST’ patch tests are all bio-compatible, specially conceived for the pharmaceutical industry.

At the beginning of 2006, new investors SOFINOVA and APAX contributed 12 million euro to DBV Technologies, providing further impetus to their work on child allergy detection and treatment systems. The company is now working in several related directions, collaborating with laboratories and universities both in Europe and the United States. Benhamou says the Nutricia laboratory, a world leader in infant nutrition, has agreed to undertake the commercial marketing of ‘DIALLERTEST’, confirming one of the most outstanding success stories in recent years the field of child allergies.

“With support from EUREKA and thanks to a particularly dynamic research team, DBV has developed a range of completely original tests,” he says, “creating strong commercial alliances on the basis of an extremely original and innovative concept. In cooperation with our Polish partner P.P.F. Hasco-Lek. Today, our products are being distributed in Mexico, Australia and the countries of the ex-USSR, and the necessary paperwork is also being completed for distribution in the US and with the European drug agency (EMEA).”

Sally Horspool | alfa
Further information:
http://www.eureka.be/multipatch

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht World first: Massive thrombosis removed during early pregnancy
20.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht Therapy of preterm birth in sight?
19.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>