Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Terminally-ill patients often denied chance to die at home

07.05.2007
Many terminally-ill patients cannot die at home because of a lack of services and training in palliative care, say researchers from the University of Warwick. Fewer and fewer people are dying at home and the most recent national statistics show only 22 per cent of cancer deaths occur there.

Jeremy Dale, Professor of Primary Care at Warwick Medical School, and Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer Daniel Munday are co-authors of a discussion paper, which features in the May issue of the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.

The article says the home death rate has continued to fall despite the rise in community palliative care services over the last 20 years in the UK. The authors highlighted a recent UK government White Paper, Building on the Best: Choice Responsiveness and Equity in the NHS, which proposed that all adult patients nearing the end of their lives should have the same access to high-quality palliative care so they can choose to die at home.

However, Professor Dale explained for a choice to be meaningful, it had to involve at least two high-quality options. He said: “The healthcare professional may feel it particularly difficult to discuss preferred place of death with a patient when providing adequate community services or securing admission to a hospice is not possible. Preferred place of death may be a hollow concept and promise of choice a cruel sham if services are not available because of a lack of funding or other resources.

“Whilst simplistic rhetoric promising patients a planned death is seductive, the reality may be that the complex, uncontrollable nature of the dying process exposes real choice as being fool’s gold.”

Patients and families need to be empowered and there should be better training for health professionals working in palliative care. The authors are calling for more research funding to address the problems.

Dr Dan Munday added: “Each individual patient’s expectations of the dying process and the way this shapes their wishes is unique. Helping patients to identify and articulate their preferences, and how these evolve in response to the patient’s changing condition, requires well-developed communication skills, including considerable sensitivity to differences in values.”

Peter Dunn | alfa
Further information:
http://www.warwick.ac.uk

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Light beam replaces blood test during heart surgery
28.02.2017 | University of Central Florida

nachricht Cells adapt ultra-rapidly to zero gravity
28.02.2017 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Existence of a new quasiparticle demonstrated

28.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Sustainable ceramics without a kiln

28.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Biofuel produced by microalgae

28.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>