Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Can you genetic makeup predict what you should eat?

07.12.2006
A new study conducted by academics at Exeter University will for the first time challenge claims made by companies and governments that we should alter our diet according to our genetic make-up.

The study funded by the UK’s largest independent medical charity, the Wellcome Trust, will explore the marketing of commercial ‘nutrigenomic’ tests, which offer DNA-based dietary advice and have sparked accusations of misleading the public with unwarranted health claims.

‘Nutrigenomics’ is the study of food and diet and how each interacts with specific genes to increase the risk of certain diseases. Scientists across the world are currently investigating how our personal genetic make-up controls how we react to food.

Popular television programmes, such as Gillian McKeith’s ‘You Are What You Eat’, have arguably made us a nation obsessed with our own eating habits. This study, led by researchers the ESRC Centre of Genomics in Society at the University of Exeter, will shed some light on whether we should regulate the field of nutrigenomics and how exactly this should be done.

Lead researcher Dr Paula Saukko comments: “There have been claims that the public is misled by the commercial kit providers. For the first time we are going to investigate what the public is being told by commercial companies and the scientists themselves.

“In the USA there are claims you can make your children more intelligent by tailoring their diet according to their genetic make-up. There is also the ‘DNA diet’ which claims you can lose weight and tone up, and even live longer by following advice based on analysis of your DNA. These tests are available over the internet so there’s nothing to stop the British public from buying them also.”

Clare Matterson, Wellcome Trust Director of Medicine, Society and History said:
“Nutrigenomics is an emerging new field which could potentially transform our view of nutrition. The work of Dr Paulo Saukko and her team at Exeter, is extremely topical coming at a time when we are bombarded by mixed messages about implication of our diet and lifestyle.

Ginny Russell | alfa
Further information:
http://www.centres.ex.ac.uk/egenis/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht World first: Massive thrombosis removed during early pregnancy
20.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht Therapy of preterm birth in sight?
19.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Topologische Quantenchemie

21.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Pulses of electrons manipulate nanomagnets and store information

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>