Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Better protection for the neonatal brain

22.11.2006
Around one in ten children is born preterm. The brain is particularly vulnerable in preterm infants. Insults during this time of brain development can subsequently lead to motor deficits, cognitive limitations, attention deficits, learning difficulties and even severe disabilities.

Within the EU project NEOBRAIN (Neonatal Estimation Of Brain Damage Risk And Identification of Neuroprotectants), scientists will collaborate in order to identify strategies to diagnose and to protect the newborn brain against such insults.

International partners

In NEOBRAIN, small and medium enterprises collaborate with academic research groups. The project links scientists from a total of 13 partner institutions. The involvement of the companies provides a unique opportunity for using the research results in product development without delay. Publication of project findings in high-profile journals will disseminate new research results and resulting applications on an international level. Scientific coordinator for the entire EU project NEOBRAIN is Prof. Dr. Olaf Dammann from Hannover Medical School, Germany. Patent research and press information will be coordinated in Innsbruck.

Name of participating organisation (Short name,City, Country)
Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (MHH, Hannover, Germany)
BIOCRATES life sciences GmbH Innsbruck (BIOCRATES, Innsbruck, Austria)
BrainZ (BrainZ, Auckland, New Zealand)
Bioanalyt GmbH (BIOANALYT, Potsdam, Germany)
THERAPTOSIS S.A. (THERAPTOSIS, Paris, France)
NEUROPHARMA (NEUROPHARMA, Madrid, Spain)
University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU, Utrecht, Netherlands)
Göteborgs universitet (UGOT, Gothenborg, Sweden)
Institut National de la santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM, Paris, France)
Université de Genève-Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève (UNIGE, Geneva, Switzerland)
Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (CHARITÉ, Berlin, Germany)
Università degli Studi di Siena (UNISI, Siena, Italy)
Lunds Universitet (ULUND, Lund, Sweden)
Economic impact
Medical progress has reduced infant death considerably. This also means that the number of preterm babies that survive is rising steadily. Of the roughly four million live births per year within the EU, 40,000 preterm babies are at highest for brain damage. Almost half the individuals with cerebral palsy (41 percent) are born preterm.

In addition to the worry for parents and relatives of prematurely born children, the increasing number of premature babies also has economic effects: across the EU, between six and seven billion euros per year are spent on treating premature babies. It is not possible to apply the results of medical research obtained in adults reliably to premature babies. Therefore the medical profession faces the problem that not only is there no marker for early diagnosis of brain damage, there is also no prophylaxis or therapy that protects the brain.

New approaches in research

It is precisely at this point that the NEOBRAIN comes in. The EU research project, which runs for three years, aims to:

1. find biomarkers for early brain damage. In various animal tests the mechanisms leading to brain damage will be investigated. Moreover, a clinical study of children born before the 28th week of pregnancy is planned in order to develop marker profiles.

2. develop strategies for protecting the brain. Here too animal tests will be carried out. Only the most promising results will find their way into clinical research.

3. create a clinical platform as research network for future European and international studies.

4. develop medication within the three year project period and beyond.

The results of neonatal basic research will thus feed directly into clinical research. New findings and therapeutic approaches gained in this way will be introduced rapidly into clinical practice in neonatal intensive care.

NEOBRAIN budget
- project volume 4.4 million euros
- grant volume 3.3 million euros

Mag. Uwe Steger | alfa
Further information:
http://www.neobrain.eu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Plasmonic biosensors enable development of new easy-to-use health tests
14.12.2017 | Aalto University

nachricht ASU scientists develop new, rapid pipeline for antimicrobials
14.12.2017 | Arizona State University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Plasmonic biosensors enable development of new easy-to-use health tests

14.12.2017 | Health and Medicine

New type of smart windows use liquid to switch from clear to reflective

14.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

BigH1 -- The key histone for male fertility

14.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>