Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Psoriasis: skin symptoms may be just the tip of the iceberg

25.10.2006
International Psoriasis Council issues a ‘call to action’ following a collaborative Consensus Meeting to review implications for clinical practice

World Psoriasis Day will have a more poignant focus this year as the International Psoriasis Council (IPC) issues a ‘call to action’ to medical experts to elevate psoriasis on the public health agenda by undertaking a more thorough therapeutic approach. Recommendations include the need to review current guidelines to ensure a more holistic approach to the management of psoriasis, taking into account the many potential co-morbidities, to prevent this significant health burden escalating. It is essential that physicians are vigilant about monitoring patients for signs of co-morbid conditions and are educated on all the therapeutic options available.

These recommendations come following a collaborative Consensus Meeting convened by the IPC held at the 15th European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (EADV) Congress earlier this month. Multi-disciplinary medical professionals from around the globe reviewed the inflammatory nature of psoriasis and how it might be linked to co-morbid conditions such as obesity, cardiovascular disease (including hypertension, and myocardial infarction), type II diabetes and liver disease.

Dr Bruce Strober, assistant professor in the department of dermatology at New York University School of Medicine, commented, “Mounting data suggest that psoriasis is a component of an inflammatory state that nurtures significant co-morbidities. It is likely that in some patients both psoriasis and obesity are co-dependent manifestations of an underlying dysfunctional pathophysiologic state. It is important that the overall management of psoriasis is significantly improved to ensure that patients are diagnosed early, appropriately treated and regularly monitored for signs of co-morbidity.”

Among the data presented at the meeting was a statistical study of over 10,000 patients in clinical trials conducted over the past 5 years, showing that psoriasis patients are more likely to have body mass index (BMI) measurements in the overweight and obese ranges than members of the general population. Building on this point, Dr Gerald Krueger of the University of Utah presented a study which indicated that psoriasis and obesity are endpoints of a shared etiology in which one may promote the other.

Important data indicating an increased risk of cardiovascular disease was presented for the first time at the meeting. A large study by Dr Joel Gelfand of the University of Pennsylvania, recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, highlighted that psoriasis may be an independent risk factor for heart attack, particularly in young individuals with severe disease. Patients in their 40s with severe psoriasis were more than twice as likely to suffer a heart attack than people without the skin disease. Dr Gelfand’s findings also shed light on potential health risks for overweight psoriasis patients. These data are supported by a case-control study presented at the meeting showing that twice the number of psoriasis patients (60%) had coronary artery calcification than non-psoriasis patients (30%).

Other studies presented at the meeting indicated that patients suffer from their skin disease much more than previously understood. One trial showed that almost half of 1,000 psoriasis patients tested were likely to be clinically depressed, and another demonstrated an increased tendency to use alcohol and tobacco among psoriasis patients.

The consensus group agreed there is overwhelmingly sufficient data supporting the linkage of psoriasis to increased co-morbid risk and to mandate furture investigations funded by both government and industry. Professor Wolfram Sterry, a board member of IPC who chaired the consensus meeting concluded, “Psoriasis is a serious condition in its own right that is exacerbated by its association with co-morbidities. It is essential that physicians understand the severity of the disease and all its manifestations and integrate therapy in a way that provides a treatment that is as broad as possible to cover all the ongoing pathogenetic events.”

Asked about the outlook for the future, Dr Menter, President of IPC is optimistic: “The hope is that now that we understand better the systemic inflammatory nature of psoriasis, we can work closely with our colleagues in medicine and research to improve the general health of our psoriasis patients by using the full spectrum of medications, including the new biologic agents.”

Drs. Sterry, Menter, and Strober are currently working on a paper that will summarise the consensus of the IPC meeting, investigate the relationship between psoriasis and co-morbidities, discuss important areas for research on these issues, and issue recommendations for clinical management of psoriasis patients at risk of developing co-morbid conditions. For now it is important that everyone touched by psoriasis recognises the severity of the condition and the profound lifelong impact it has on health.

Maja Haglund | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ketchum.com
http://www.psoriasiscouncil.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Nanoparticles as a Solution against Antibiotic Resistance?
15.12.2017 | Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

nachricht Plasmonic biosensors enable development of new easy-to-use health tests
14.12.2017 | Aalto University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First-of-its-kind chemical oscillator offers new level of molecular control

DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors.

Researchers have created chemical amplifiers and a chemical oscillator using a systematic method that has the potential to embed sophisticated circuit...

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Engineers program tiny robots to move, think like insects

15.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

One in 5 materials chemistry papers may be wrong, study suggests

15.12.2017 | Materials Sciences

New antbird species discovered in Peru by LSU ornithologists

15.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>