Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Focus On The Prevention Of Heart Disease And Stroke During The Clinton Global Initiative

20.09.2006
The World Heart Federation, a nongovernmental organisation dedicated to the prevention and control of heart disease and stroke, with a focus on low- and middle-income countries, is taking an active part in the second annual meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI).

The event, taking place in New York between 20 - 22 September will bring together over 1,000 global leaders from business, politics, academia, science, religion, and non-governmental organizations, including numerous Heads of State and CEOs from major international corporations. CGI is a forum for participants to discuss and develop workable solutions to some of the world's most pressing challenges, including the prevention of heart disease and stroke which claims 17.5 million lives a year, 80% of these in low and middle income countries.

The World Heart Federation will announce two major new commitments for which partial funding has already been committed but needs to be met by pledges of additional support by the global leaders during or after the CGI.

Prevention of Rheumatic Fever / Rheumatic Heart Disease in Africa

The World Heart Federation will set up four demonstration projects, one in each of Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana and South Africa, that will grow into sustainable, long-term, government-run national rheumatic heart disease-control programmes. The projects will raise awareness through public and professional education, establish surveillance systems, advocate improving health services, and promote effective prevention measures.

Rheumatic fever (RF) can develop after an infection by the group A streptococcus bacterium. The resulting inflammatory illness can damage heart valves; this is called rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and can lead to disability or death. RF and RHD affects 15.6 million people worldwide, including 2.4 million children, and is the most common cardiovascular disease of children and young adults. There are nearly half a million new cases every year, 300,000 of them in Africa. Hundreds of thousands of people are disabled by RHD and some 350,000 die from it each year. 233,000 of those deaths are in Africa.

The tragedy is that almost all of these deaths are easily preventable using regular injection of penicillin. Despite the wide availability and the proven effectiveness of penicillin for the prevention of RF and RHD, developing countries continue to face unacceptably high rates of RF and RHD, making RHD the most common cardiovascular disease affecting children and young adults in the world .

“Our aim is to significantly reduce mortality, morbidity and disability from rheumatic fever/rheumatic heart disease among African children and young adults,” said Dr Jonathan Carapetis, chairman of the World Heart Federation’s Scientific Council on Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease. “Rheumatic heart disease shortens people’s lives and aggravates human misery. We will train health workers in how to identify and treat patients, and public health officials in how to establish and maintain prevention programmes. But this is not enough. We will also advocate for guaranteed supplies of high-quality antibiotics and for rheumatic heart disease to be recognized as an international clinical, public health and political priority.”

The World Heart Federation is presently leading the global effort in RHD control. Its RHD control project in the South Pacific, which began in 2005, has a regional training programme and demonstration projects in Fiji and Samoa. So far, the project has screened 3,000 children and its first regional training workshop will be held this October. The WHO supports the programme and is co-sponsoring the workshop. Tools developed and experiences gained in the Pacific are being made available to the world through the World Heart Federation website, and will be adapted for the project in Africa.

Development, Production and Delivery of the Polypill

The World Heart Federation also intends to advocate for the development, production and delivery of the polypill for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in post myocardial infarction patients by 2009/10. The initiative conducted in partnership with CNIC, the Spanish National Centre for Cardiovascular Research.

The aim is to save the lives of those severely affected by cardiovascular disease by successfully completing the development of a polypill or fixed dose combination of ace inhibitor, statin and aspirin therapies.

The aim is also to build knowledge and commitment among practicing physicians particularly in low- and middle-income countries to facilitate distribution as of 2010. Pilot countries are being identified but will probably include Spain and China.

The World Heart Federation’s primary contribution would be in the area of advocacy and education. The World Heart Federation would advocate for the polypill with the relevant authorities including the FDA and EMEA, and through its national member societies, journals and congresses encourage its inclusion in national guidelines and use by cardiologists in post myocardial infarction patients.

With chronic diseases including cardiovascular disease and diabetes accounting for 60% of global mortality, and 80% of that burden in low and middle-income countries, it is time to advance the prevention agenda as well as patient care. It is proven that appropriate stand-alone medications ranging from statins to aspirin have had very beneficial effects on premature mortality in Western populations. Many of these medications are now off patent and as such are available at lower generic prices. However, the complexity of three or more medications would strain developing country health systems both financially and logistically. Patient compliance would be another complicating factor.

A polypill is estimated to cost one-fifth of currently available therapies and save the lives of post-myocardial infarction patients as well as high risk individuals in low- and middle-income countries as well as low income patients in more developed economies who would otherwise have limited treatment options. The production of the polypill has been recommended in recent reports by the World Health Organization.

Michelle Roverelli | alfa
Further information:
http://www.cwnewsroom.ch

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht NIST scientists discover how to switch liver cancer cell growth from 2-D to 3-D structures
17.11.2017 | National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

nachricht High speed video recording precisely measures blood cell velocity
15.11.2017 | ITMO University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

Im Focus: Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analyzed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.

During a CT analysis, the object under investigation is x-rayed and a detector measures the respective amount of radiation absorbed from various angles....

Im Focus: Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer

The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future to build a data bus for quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the journal Nature Communications.

Future quantum computers will be able to solve problems where conventional computers fail today. We are still far away from any large-scale implementation,...

Im Focus: Wrinkles give heat a jolt in pillared graphene

Rice University researchers test 3-D carbon nanostructures' thermal transport abilities

Pillared graphene would transfer heat better if the theoretical material had a few asymmetric junctions that caused wrinkles, according to Rice University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA detects solar flare pulses at Sun and Earth

17.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

NIST scientists discover how to switch liver cancer cell growth from 2-D to 3-D structures

17.11.2017 | Health and Medicine

The importance of biodiversity in forests could increase due to climate change

17.11.2017 | Studies and Analyses

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>