Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New Dieting Definitions Feed New Dieting Test

24.08.2006
An eating-problem research and support organisation has developed a unique dieting behaviour self-test to help dieters identify their relationships with food and eating.

The free tool to help pinpoint personal eating issues is underpinned by a radical new view of what persistent dieters' lifestyles actually comprise.

Weight-control charity The Weight Foundation's re-evaluation of the nature and extent of dieting springs from its findings to date that many more individuals lead dieting-dominated lives than is commonly recognised.

Detailed interviews with over 500 persistent dieters from several countries has allowed the creation of The Hardcore Dieting Index self-diagnostic questionnaire.

The Manchester UK-based group has developed its own concept of what it calls Hardcore Dieters – people whose lives are dominated by weight-loss, eating and self-image issues. Its new test, which is now underpinned by over 4 years of campaigning for natural weight-control strategies, helps long-term dieters to asess their own potential problem areas.

As well as conducting its own international research, the non-commercial organisation is also informed by a Ph.D project being run at Manchester Metropolitan University by its founder, 46 year old Cambridge social sciences graduate Malcolm Evans.

“Far too many people suffer miserable lives divorced from a relaxed relationship with food and eating. The key to lasting weight control is not permanent dieting but rather holding food only as a necessary tool of life, not its master,” says Evans.

Within the overall notion of Hardcore Dieting are three specific categories. “Swinger Dieting” is the term which is nearest to the classic idea of Yo-Yo Dieting. Evans explains that these are the type of people normally evoked when the term “dieters” is used. In his experience the relationship between losing and gaining can be more erratic and variable, subject to a number of factors – and hence he prefers the looser idea of a Swinger Dieter. Whatever the precise mechanics and what it is called, this kind of physical roller-coaster is also a distressing emotional roller-coaster.

“Flatliner Dieters” are said to live their lives as if just about every day is a mini-Swinger cycle between “good” foods and “bad” foods and between a feeling of overeating and a sense of deprivation. Never really comfortable around food and eating issues, they are so-named for two reasons. Firstly, they may not show the jagged peaks and troughs of dramatically varying weights, tending to remain largely constant by physical size. Secondly, they are often “flatlining” through their lives, having the emotional heart knocked out of them by stormy and distressing relationships with food, eating and dieting. Flatliners tend to suffer in silence, often embarrassed by the lack of control at the centre of their lives. Evans' specific doctoral research is concerned mainly with the cultural and emotional pressures that drag and trap people into dieting lifestyles.

“Lifer Dieting” describes those dieters who never or rarely come off a diet, even though the precise diet may change. Lifers fear that letting go of strict dieting control might spell disaster. Lifers, finds The Weight Foundation, often try to recruit new prisoners to a full-time dieting lifestyle because sharing the misery somehow helps to make sense of it.

Through his extensive work with dieters, Evans has come to recognise the Flatiner ( “messy wavering”) and Lifer (“painful maintaining”) groups and to realize that these sizable numbers of people largely sit outside conventional dieting definitions.

“The Hardcore Dieting Index is both a product of all our research to date and is also continuing to drive fresh research. It will continue to evolve but we think it's value is to empower dieters with self-knowledge about individual behaviors and hence present remedial options. This is intended to be quite the opposite of risking pathologising problem dieters by pinning quasi-medical conditions on them,” concludes Evans.

The Weight Foundation seeks to develop solutions which emphasise natural eating rhythms and an unravelling of the societal drivers to overeating, avoiding artificial dieting interventions.

Malcolm Evans | alfa
Further information:
http://www.weightfoundation.com/diet-lives.asp

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties
23.02.2017 | Vanderbilt University

nachricht Researchers identify cause of hereditary skeletal muscle disorder
22.02.2017 | Klinikum der Universität München

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance

27.02.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Decoding the genome's cryptic language

27.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>