Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Automated external defibrillators are frequently recalled

10.08.2006
A new study shows that automated external defibrillators (AEDs), the devices used to resuscitate victims of sudden cardiac arrest, had a greater than 20 percent chance of being recalled for potential malfunction over the past decade.

The findings, reported in the August 9 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), suggest the need for a more reliable system to locate and repair potentially defective devices in a timely fashion.

"Though they are simple to use, AEDs are, in fact, complex medical devices," explains the study's senior author William Maisel, MD, MPH, director of the Pacemaker and Defibrillator Service at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. "It is therefore not surprising that they may occasionally malfunction. An AED recall rate of 1 in 5 over the past decade, however, is too high."

The portable units provide voice commands, automated heart rhythm analysis, and if necessary, shock delivery to resuscitate victims of cardiac arrest. Their ease of operation -- coupled with their clinically proven ability to improve the survival of cardiac arrest victims -- has resulted in their widespread use in recent years.

"During the period we followed – between 1996 and 2005 – the annual number of AEDs distributed increased almost 10-fold, from fewer than 20,000 in 1996 to nearly 200,000 in 2005," says Maisel. Many public areas such as airports, sports arenas, casinos, schools and churches are now routinely outfitted with AEDs, and certain AED models have even been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use without a prescription, enabling consumers to purchase them more easily.

In their study, Maisel and coauthor Jignesh Shah, MD, of BIDMC's Cardiovascular Division determined the number and rate of AED safety alerts and recalls (collectively referred to as "advisories") as well as the number of actual AED malfunctions by analyzing weekly FDA Enforcement Reports and reports of AED-related adverse events. (The FDA routinely issues such "advisories" to notify the public about potentially defective medical devices.)

Their comprehensive analysis showed that between 1996 and 2005, a total of 52 advisories affecting 385,922 AEDs or critical AED accessories were issued. They also found that device malfunctions occurred during attempted resuscitation in 370 patients. Device recalls were most often issued due to hardware malfunctions, which may result in a failure of the AED to power on, to charge, or to successfully deliver a shock.

"AEDs are responsible for saving thousands of lives," notes Maisel. "Time to defibrillation is the most important determinant of survival for patients who have suffered a cardiac arrest." However, he adds, as AED distribution continues to increase, the number of devices prone to malfunction can also be expected to increase.

"Unlike implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) which are routinely registered with the manufacturer at the time of implantation, no such process reliably occurs with AEDs," Maisel explains. "Our study demonstrates that there is an urgent need to develop a more reliable system to identify and repair potentially defective AEDs in a timely fashion and to better notify AED owners when their devices are recalled."

Bonnie Prescott | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.bidmc.harvard.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht On track to heal leukaemia
18.01.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht Penn vet research identifies new target for taming Ebola
12.01.2017 | University of Pennsylvania

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

Im Focus: How to inflate a hardened concrete shell with a weight of 80 t

At TU Wien, an alternative for resource intensive formwork for the construction of concrete domes was developed. It is now used in a test dome for the Austrian Federal Railways Infrastructure (ÖBB Infrastruktur).

Concrete shells are efficient structures, but not very resource efficient. The formwork for the construction of concrete domes alone requires a high amount of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

Nothing will happen without batteries making it happen!

05.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A big nano boost for solar cells

18.01.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Glass's off-kilter harmonies

18.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Toward a 'smart' patch that automatically delivers insulin when needed

18.01.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>