Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cincinnati Surgeon’s Pediatric Laparoscopic Liver Surgery a World First

09.08.2006
A University of Cincinnati (UC) surgeon recently performed what is believed to be the world’s first pediatric laparoscopic liver surgery, a specialized procedure for removing cancerous liver tumors without the need for a major incision.

Mark Thomas, MD, an assistant professor and transplant surgeon at UC, performed the operation in a 2-year-old boy with liver cancer on May 24 at La Raza Pediatric Medical Hospital in Mexico City.

Liver cancer is rare in children—less than 150 cases are diagnosed each year compared to more than 18,000 in adults—so the disease often misdiagnosed as constipation, food intolerance or anorexia until it is in advanced and difficult-to-treat stage.

This patient’s symptoms had been dismissed as such for several months before physicians confirmed he had hepatoblastoma of the liver, a type of cancer that starts in the organ’s cells (hepatocytes) and develops into one or multiple tumors. Thomas was invited to the La Raza Pediatric Medical Hospital to perform the patient’s surgery and teach two lectures on the specialized minimally invasive procedure.

Laparoscopic (minimally invasive) surgery is a method of operating inside the abdomen through small, tube-like ports using a fiber-optic light source, camera and specialized instruments. Known as laparoscopic liver resection, this procedure requires incisions so small (about three-inches) that they leave only minimal scarring.

Two months post-surgery, the patient is doing well and is expected to have a full recovery after several additional rounds of chemotherapy.

Thomas says the procedure is a safe, effective alternative to traditional “open” surgery for liver cancer—which requires up to a 30-inch incision. It also is available for patients with advanced liver disease who cannot tolerate the standard operation. The minimally invasive laparoscopic approach is most often used to remove liver tumors and treat other liver diseases.

”Laparoscopic liver resection results in less pain and faster recovery times for patients,” Thomas explains. “Adult patients can usually start eating again a day after surgery and are back to work within one or two weeks.”

“Now we’ve shown that the same procedure can improve survival for patients with childhood liver cancer,” he adds.

Thomas says the laparoscopic liver procedure has the same success rates as traditional open surgery and the patient usually goes home within two days.

The liver, one of the body’s largest organs, helps metabolize food and medicine absorbed from the intestines in the blood supply, produces bile to help digest fats, and stores energy-producing glycogen (sugar).

Primary liver cancer—which grows from within the organ as opposed to spreading there from another area of the body—is rare. In adults, the most common type of primary liver cancer is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and in pediatric patients it is hepatoblastoma. Both develop from hepatocytes and can occur as one or multiple tumors. HCC accounts for 80 percent of all primary liver cancers. Colorectal, breast and gastric cancers also commonly spread to the liver.

To perform the laparoscopic liver procedure, carbon dioxide gas is pumped into the patient’s abdomen to increase the operative area and improve visualization of the tumor. The surgeon then makes two to four small incisions on the right side of the rib cage to accommodate the laparoscope, a tiny “telescope” equipped with a camera, and other specialized surgical instruments. The surgeon then severs and ties off tumor’s blood supply, cuts out the tumor itself, places it inside a sealed bag, and removes it through one of the incisions.

“The liver is a self-healing organ,” explains Thomas, “so once the cancerous tumor is removed the area typically heals within two to four weeks.”

Research suggests that cirrhosis, a condition that results in scarring of the liver tissue and long-term hepatitis B and C infections, can increase the risk for liver cancer. People who abuse alcohol, smoke cigarettes or are obese are also at an increased risk for the disease.

Thomas and his team perform about 250 laparoscopic liver cases a year. According to a literature review, there are no published reports of laparoscopic liver resection in a pediatric patient with cancer.

“Only a handful of centers in the world perform the number of specialized laparoscopic liver surgeries that we do in Cincinnati,” adds Thomas.

The American Cancer Society estimates that about 18,000 new cases of primary liver cancer and bile duct cancer will be diagnosed in the United States during 2006. Because of a higher incidence rate of hepatitis B and C, liver cancer is more common in developing countries in Africa and East Asia than in the United States.

Amanda Harper | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.lapliver.com

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Penn studies find promise for innovations in liquid biopsies
30.03.2017 | University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

nachricht 'On-off switch' brings researchers a step closer to potential HIV vaccine
30.03.2017 | University of Nebraska-Lincoln

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

'On-off switch' brings researchers a step closer to potential HIV vaccine

30.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

Penn studies find promise for innovations in liquid biopsies

30.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

An LED-based device for imaging radiation induced skin damage

30.03.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>