Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Ensuring That Genetic Testing From Different Laboratories Yields the Same Results

10.07.2006
For individuals who develop colorectal cancers at a young age or have a family history of such cancers, microsatellite instability testing (MSI) has become an almost standard component of clinical evaluation. This DNA-based test can uncover hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer syndrome (HNPCC), also called Lynch’s syndrome. However, despite the increased use of this test, there have been no reports of how well the results from any given laboratory agree with any other laboratory. In an article in the current issue of Cancer Biomarkers, researchers conducted testing across 6 laboratories to evaluate variability in reported results.

Because the underlying technology, PCR amplification, is now routine in all molecular genetics laboratories, there has been an implicit assumption that MSI testing would be reproducible and reliable. The initial results uncovered significant discordance among laboratories and led the researchers to expand their study in an attempt to learn the causes of the disagreements.

The six laboratories, located in the United States, Canada, and Australia, were members of the Cooperative Family Registry for Colon Cancer Studies (also called the Colon CFR). Using tumor samples collected since 1998 through the CFR, MSI testing was done at the six laboratories. Three of the laboratories had more than 8 years each of prior experience in MSI testing, while the other three set up MSI assays specifically for the Colon CFR. When the result showed wide disagreement with no systematic trends, one of the most experienced laboratories was designated the “gold standard” reference facility. With further testing of samples among the most experienced laboratories, the credentials of the reference laboratory were validated. A review of the results from all of the facilities resulted in five key rules that laboratories should observe when conducting MSI testing. Using these lessons learned, a final set of testing showed much improved agreement across all six laboratories.

Writing in the article, Noralane M. Lindor states, “This experience flushed out some important principles in MSI testing…and demonstrated that a very high degree of concordance for MSI testing is feasible….We strongly urge all clinical and research laboratories conducting MSI to participate in a sample exchange validation with an experienced group or consortium and that clinical laboratory certifying bodies develop plans to evaluate quality of MSI testing results being returned to clinicians and patients.”

The article is “Ascending the Learning Curve – MSI Testing Experience of a Six-Laboratory Consortium” by Noralane M. Lindor, Regenia Smalley, Melissa Barker, Jeannette Bigler, Lisa M. Krumroy, Annette Lum-Jones, Sarah J. Plummer, Teresa Selander, Sushma Thomas, Michelle Youash, Daniela Seminara, Graham Casey , Bharati Bapat, and Stephen N. Thibodeau. It appears in a special issue of Cancer Biomarkers, Volume 2, Issues 1-2 (July 2006), Lynch Syndrome (HNPCC) and Microsatellite Instability 2, published by IOS Press.

Lynch Syndrome (HNPCC) and Microsatellite Instability 2
Cancer Biomarkers, Volume 2, Issues 1-2 (July 2006)
Guest Editor: Asad Umar
Table of Contents
Asad Umar: Lynch Syndrome (HNPCC) and Microsatellite Instability Analysis Guidelines

Noralane M. Lindor et al.: Ascending the Learning Curve – MSI testing experience of a Six-Laboratory Consortium

Emanuela Lucci-Cordisco, Luigi Boccuto, Giovanni Neri, Maurizio Genuardi: The Use of Microsatellite Instability, Immunohistochemistry and Other Variables in Determining the Clinical Significance of MLH1 and MSH2 Unclassified Variants in Lynch Syndrome

Darryl Shibata: When Does MMR Loss Occur During HNPCC Progression?

Ivana Fridrichova: New Aspects in Molecular Diagnosis of Lynch Syndrome (HNPCC)

Won-Seok Jo and John M. Carethers: Chemotherapeutic Implications in Microsatellite Unstable Colorectal Cancer

John I. Risinger, et al.: Gene Expression Analysis of Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocyte Markers in Endometrial Cancers Indicates No Significant Increases in Those Cases with Microsatellite Instability

Stefan M. Woerner, et al.: Microsatellite Instability in the Development of DNA Mismatch Repair Deficient Tumors

Astrid Engelen | alfa
Further information:
http://www.iospress.nl

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Nanoparticles as a Solution against Antibiotic Resistance?
15.12.2017 | Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

nachricht Plasmonic biosensors enable development of new easy-to-use health tests
14.12.2017 | Aalto University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First-of-its-kind chemical oscillator offers new level of molecular control

DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors.

Researchers have created chemical amplifiers and a chemical oscillator using a systematic method that has the potential to embed sophisticated circuit...

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Engineers program tiny robots to move, think like insects

15.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

One in 5 materials chemistry papers may be wrong, study suggests

15.12.2017 | Materials Sciences

New antbird species discovered in Peru by LSU ornithologists

15.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>