Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Rare fatal breathing disorder benefits from teamwork, skill and new national funding


Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust (GOSH) has recently secured long term funding for its life saving tracheal service, which treats children suffering from extremely narrow windpipes. (Long Segment Tracheal Stenosis)

Children born with very narrow windpipes suffer breathing difficulties and often die. The surgery to correct this has historically been very difficult and where surgeons have little experience in this rare condition, results are not always good. A new service, officially launched this week, of designated experts at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust (GOSH) has produced better results and has now secured long term funding from government agency NSCAG.

The Tracheal Team at GOSH is a group of health professionals that have been brought together to provide a range of expertise. The team includes specialists in Ear, Nose & Throat (ENT), Interventional Radiology, Intensive Care, cardiothoracic surgery and physiotherapy. Since it was formed in 2000 the tracheal service has become a world leader in the field. The team is innovative in its degree of cross-skilling.

Imagine running a 100-metre sprint and then trying to breathe through a straw. For children suffering from Long Segment Tracheal Stenosis, this is what trying to breathe normally can feel like. The surgical technique the team use is called slide tracheoplasty which involves making cuts into the narrowed part of the trachea, which can sometimes be only a few millimetres wide, and sliding the two sections over each other until the part of the trachea that is normal width is reached.

Martin Elliott, Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery, leads the team, he said: “Traditionally children with Long Segment Tracheal Stenosis have been managed by individual specialists who can only see a tiny number of such cases during the course of their careers. Now that GOSH has been designated as a National Centre, we are able to concentrate our expertise and provide not just one specialist but also many who take an interest in this and whose skills overlap to provide an efficient, well-informed and up-to-date service.

We have trained each other to carry out a number of skills so that provided we can get children in to hospital there should be no delay in management, and we meet regularly as a multidisciplinary team to make treatment plans, care pathways and to communicate with referring hospitals and patients and their families. By seeing a relatively large number of such patients we are able to contribute research to the world’s literature and influence the way in which care of these patients is undertaken worldwide. We have already demonstrated good results and improved efficiency and intend to continue in this way.”

The service has secured funding from NSCAG from April 2006, which means that this vital service will be able to continue its good work.

Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity is actively fundraising £31 million for a Heart and Lung Centre. The Heart and Lung Centre will occupy three and a half floors of the proposed new clinical building and unites clinical care, training and research. Investment in innovation and teamwork will help us develop many more world-class services, saving lives and making the best use of NHS resources.

Sarah Empey | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Inflammation Triggers Unsustainable Immune Response to Chronic Viral Infection
24.10.2016 | Universität Basel

nachricht Resolving the mystery of preeclampsia
21.10.2016 | Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Ice shelf vibrations cause unusual waves in Antarctic atmosphere

25.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

Fluorescent holography: Upending the world of biological imaging

25.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Etching Microstructures with Lasers

25.10.2016 | Process Engineering

More VideoLinks >>>